Create a corpus from a list of articles (ex. here: popular on Facebook).

You want to create a Corpus of Media for your analytics and/or a whitelist of media similar to a list of articles?

Here is how Corpus Intelligence can help in 3 steps:

Step 1. Collect Materials.  

Let’s start with a list of popular articles: Today, the Top 15 of the most engaged articles on Facebook in Sept 2019

In this article you can find the following top 15 articles:

Table to show the top 15 web stories on Facebook in September 2019, ranked by engagement

Step 2. Understand Profiles

From the list above, we’ve collected the profiles of  the corresponding media.

Here are the top 30 most popular classifications from our 3-level AI-powered taxonomy.  

This means the top 5 most popular media types are:

  1. Politics
  2. Law
  3. Entertainment and Leisure
  4. Lifestyle
  5. Society 

Computing C.scores give precisely the classifications to shoot for.

Step 3. Build and manage Corpuses.

The hardest part is done. Let’s play with TrustedOut now:
Want all media in Politics and Law? here it is:
Want to target the dedicated media in the 1st classification, International, in Politics? Voila:

From here, feed your analytics tool and/or create a whitelist for your DSP.

Questions? Contact us!

TrustedOut: Intelligence you trust. Brand Safety you trust. PR you trust.

TrustedOut helps your business all the way, all the time.

Let say here, your company, SmartBizFurnitures, builds and commercializes high end, classy Business Furnitures.  SmartBizFurnitures believes Lifestyle applies to Business environments.

Sources you trust to get reliable intelligence.

You must trust the content you use to trust any decision you make.

SmartBizFurnitures asks TrustedOut for all media sources covering:
People › Lifestyle › Decoration And Design And Architecture

Because they are looking for insights from their intelligence tool (Digimind, Netvibes, etc…), they decide to:

  • Solely select the classification your business is in: People › Lifestyle › Decoration And Design And Architecture
  • Pick “covered” to get a large but relevant number of sources for our analytic tools.
  • Go with the shortest period of taxonomy, the rolling “Past week”,  because they want to be news-sensitive.
Mouse over to zoom

TrustedOut finds 481 sources. Click on “Get”…

Intelligence tools ready.

… download the CSV file of those 481 sources and import them in your semantic/social intelligence tool. Your tool will continue to listen to all new articles from those sources. Should you need articles abstracts from the past, ask us as we archive everything we’ve computed.

This download of sources is manual and thus your list of sources won’t be updated unless you do regular download and import to your intelligence tool. To avoid this and always analyze the freshest, most up to date sources, select “Connect”.

Media you trust to keep your brand safe.

Here you want the widest AND most relevant (read consistant) list of media for the safest whitelist you will feed your ad server with.

This time ask TrustedOut for the whole classification group: Lifestyle, but this time we want to get the largest but secure list of media who have published on Lifestyle in the past 7 days.

TrustedOut finds 3,717 media (and 10,037 sources)

mouse over to zoom

Brand cannot be with “Politics”

SmartBizFurnitures does not want to be involved into “Politics”, so, those 7% should disappear from our Corpus map.

Let’s remove the whole classification “Politics”… with the 4th line: Media covering Politics in the past 7 days should be removed from the list:

mouse over to zoom

Of course, we have less media: 936 instead of 3,717 but it’s the choice made by SmartBizFurnitures to keep their brand safe and consistant.

DSP ready.

Same as with Sources. Here you will download the Media list as CSV but, as your brand must remain safe all over an ad campaign, you will want to “Connect” so the list of media = the Whitelist, will be up to date at all time.

Articles you trust to build on your PR efforts.

For our reading. we want the latest articles from the most relevant sources.

We will ask TrustedOut to give us our classification, as with Analytics, People › Lifestyle › Decoration And Design And Architecture, but since here, it’s not a machine analyzing but humans, likely a PR team or directly executives, we will select: Dedicated over the past 7 days.

mouse over to zoom

100+ a day. 20,000+ archived.

On average, TrustedOut will provide 102 articles abstracts and can provide more than 20,000 from archives upon request.

A click on the right “Get” gives us:

mouse over to zoom

Spot on for your PR efforts.

Click on the abstract article to read the article. Very interesting for SmartBizFurnitures. PR effort right here.

mouse over to zoom. Click to read.

Watch tool ready.

Simple. Download: RSS.

Use this RSS as any RSS. Corporate pages, alerts, newsletters…

For example, in Netvibes:

mouse over to zoom. Click to discover Netvibes

or in Feedly:

mouse over to zoom. click to visit feedly.com

Your business is made of the content you trust.

Your business is all about the content you trust.

Contact us: contact@trustedout.com

Corpus Intelligence for an Industry: Aerospace & Defense – October 2019

Media covering Aerospace & Defense.

In the US, 443 media and 779 sources are covering  over the past quarter, publishing an average of 4+k new articles a day.

In France, 56 media and 111 sources are covering  over the past quarter, publishing an average of 360 new articles a day.

Media per Expertise Level and News Sensitivity.

TrustedOut uniquely profiles media per level of expertise (Dedicated > Specialized > Covered > All) AND per profiling period (past week, past month, past quarter). This profiling period identifies News sensitivity. Past week is more sensitive to the latest news, while Past Quarter is more stable. This is very convenient depending on the type of project you’re driving.

Reminder:

  • Media: unique domains used (xxxx.yyy)
  • Sources: unique feeds belonging to a Media. Mostly correspond to a section of the Media
  • Articles per day: number of articles published and analyzed by TrustedOut
  • Archived articles: Article abstracts and links archived on the corresponding Sources.

For the US:

For France:

A&D media market shares in the US and France

Despite a difference in Past Quarter vs Past Week showing little sensitivity to news, the number of articles per day and archived is fairly high, meaning a strong need to listen and analyze industry evolutions.
While at equal level in Dedicated and Specialized Media, the US have more media covering this industry than France.

Related group classifications.

In the US, A&D Media also cover:

In the US, Media covering Aerospace & Defense in the past quarter also cover:

Radar view:

DNA view:

Mouse over to zoom

In France, A&D Media also cover:

In France, Media covering Aerospace & Defense in the past quarter also cover:

Radar view:

DNA view:

Mouse over to zoom

In both countries, Aerospace & Defense is close to another industry: Transportation.
In the France, Aerospace & Defense is even more related to Transportation, Law and Fundamental Sciences when, in the US, it is more Politics.
Also, in France, Aerospace & Defense is more related to Satellites and Transportation via Air, and Law is seen as International, while, in the US, People means Society.

Fine tuning your Corpus

Example: Want Aerospace & Defense but NOT Military Defense

You need to listen and/or analyze, or want to target for PR or ads, all media about Defense but not Military Defense. The query to set your Corpus will look like this:

Of course, we are moving from 443 media and 143 sources to:

Two third of the media in Aerospace & Defense are also classified as  Military Defense.

Brand Safety Risk and Toxic Content: None

Mouse over to zoom.
Mouse over to zoom.

Media covering Aerospace & Defense are not victims of toxic content and Brand Safety Risks.

Digging into top Media.

Avionics (US)

Name Avionics
Website https://www.aviationtoday.com
Feeds

Classification over past Quarter

Trends

 

Futura Sciences (France)

Name Futura
Website https://www.futura-sciences.com
Feeds

Classification over past Quarter

Trends

How our AI-powered classification works

How our AI-powered classification works.

Now you can trust decisions made on content you trust

Importance for Business Intelligence:
No trust, no Intelligence.

Works on all sectors.

Say you are in the food market and want to understand how some cuisine types are perceived amongst specialized publications in America:

To feed your intelligence tools, such as Digimind (demo here), your Corpus will look like this.

Say you are in the food market and want to understand how some cuisine types are perceived amongst specialized publications in America:

To feed your intelligence tools, such as Digimind (demo here), your Corpus will look like this.

16,000+ sources (49k new articles abstracts a day) will ensure you analyze, and thus base your strategic decisions, on content you define.

Would you have thought Better Homes and Gardens would be part of your Corpus? At first, Home and Garden does not sound like Food and beverage specialist, does it? (well, if you are looking for Chicken recipes, it’s here).

This anecdote is to point out the need for both an unbiased and universal classification and a depth of expertise from the content you will base your decisions on.

It is critical you trust the right, and all the right, publications to trust any intelligence coming out of those publications. Depth and width.

No Trust, No Intelligence.

Consequently, the solution is to:

1/ Have marketers define their Corpus from profiles of media they trust for each analysis, each product, each segment, each brand.
And align in each country.

2/ Have those corpuses automatically built, maintained and updated, directly serving your analytics tool.

Bottom line: Define the content you trust so you can trust decisions you make.
“If it’s not trusted in, it can not be trusted out!”

Importance for Advertising:
Brand Safety and Budget Optimization.

Here, you want to advertise your new product to the US Food Market. Keeping your brand safe will be your top priority… After all, you will pay to increase your business, not ruin the brand reputation it took you years to build.

Brand Safety is top priority for CEOs and CMOs.

For your online ad campaign, the trading desk of your advertising agency will define the query, with, amongst other things, desired and not-desired keywords, to select the content you trust compatible with your brand.

But a page can match all those criteria but be published on a site not safe or compatible with the advertiser’s brand. You must also select the publications you trust compatible with your brand.

Otherwise, your brand is at risk. And advertisers know and fear it:

4 in 10 brands deliver ads on unsafe sites – Cision

The only solution for the CMO to be certain to keep brands safe: Define himself the lists of publications he trusts compatible with her/his brands.

Consequence:

70% implement black or white lists… – Digiday

But while the vast majority is using lists, the vast majority is unhappy with the solution. As of today:

… but 64% fear negative impacts on performance.  71% fear to not achieve reach while delivering to the right audience in the right context. – Cision

Consequently, the solution is to:

1/ Have marketers define their white lists themselves for each campaign, each brand. And align in each country.

2/ Have those lists automatically built, maintained and updated, directly serving the trading desk.

Bottom line: Keep your Brand Safe, let TrustedOut manage your white lists.

Let’s go back to our US Food Market example. Our marketer, here, wants to build a white list of US based publications, specialized in Food and Beverage and also wants them to be in business for more than 3 years, not politically, nor religiously oriented and, of course, not spotted as fake news, hate news or junk science.

Corpus looks like above and now more than 9,000+ sources are immediately available to be imported or live feeding your trading desk.

Trading desk runs its query within the perimeter of the white list. Best of both worlds, search and directory.
Brand is now totally safe.

Run more where it returns more.

In addition, Media Profiles bring ad budget optimization.

By adding media profiles to a campaign report, marketers and agencies can surface media with the best ROI and thus, increase budgets where return is optimal.

BHG works best for your campaign? Let’s get more of this profile and spend your ad budget where it makes the most sense.

Matter of fact, Your business is all about the content you trust.

Your business is all about the content you trust.

Questions? Contact us!

 

 

Media: Contributing to polarization AND reflective of polarization.

12 of this year’s 15 most politically polarizing brands are national news outlets

Thanks to this article from Morning Consult, Media Companies Dominate Most Divisive Brands List, and It Keeps Getting Worse, for this chart:

Copyrights: Morning Consult

“Democrats think the media is more important and made Republicans think it was more biased”

This quote from Matt Grossman, an associate political science professor at the Michigan State University, illustrates, for example, the difference between Republicans’ and Democrats’ net favorability for CNN, for example, stood at 66 percentage points last year. It grew 14 points to 80 this year, due to a 12-point drop in net favorability among Republicans, from minus 13 to minus 25. Republicans held more negative views than Democrats of every media outlet on the list except for Fox News. 

Polarization: Contribution and Reflection.

Which makes Joe Barone, managing partner of Brand Safety Americas for GroupM, say “In a way, it’s really corroboration of the narrative in the industry right now,… The narrative is that we’re living in a polarized world, and media is both contributing to the polarization and reflective of the polarization.”

Polarization is good for (media) business…

…major media outlets that have embraced a more adversarial stance on Trump since his election, business has been good. Viewership for all three leading cable networks — CNN, Fox News and MSNBC — increased in 2018, per a Pew Research Center analysis of Comscore data.

… but bad for (media) credibility.

Perceptions of media credibility have dropped since 2016, according to Morning Consult analysis, largely fueled by Republican attitudes. Democrats and Republicans also tend to trust headlines from outlets that society considers closer to their ideology, although that changes by topic.

Means you better know the (here political) media profile.

In our Business Case #1, we demo how Content Orientation can twist an insights coming out of your analytics tool.

The very same analytics were run using the very same analytics tool, Netvibes, across the whole Corpus (the All column) and one per political wing (Sources: BPI events).
Gauging the level of political orientation of your Corpus will drive your reading of your analytics tools and thus what you make from it.

Yes, Political orientations influence your analytics (and thus, your decision-making).

From the analytics results above, when it comes to AI, left wing oriented media are more negative, feels a foreign influence from Silicon Valley and China, and do not link AI with smartphones.
Right wing publications are way less negative, local sensitive, linked to iPhone only (vs all publications both linked to both android and iphone)
Bottom line: PR efforts should insist on the local development of ACME cars, re-insure, re-comfort on AI being a benefit, not a threat and have no link to smartphones, use or ownership.

Questions? Contact us!

Corpus Intelligence for an Industry: Lifestyle – October 2019

Media covering Lifestyle.

In the US, 3,007 media and 8,300 sources are covering Lifestyle over the past quarter, publishing over 38,000 new articles a day.

In France, 327 media and 596 sources are covering Lifestyle over the past quarter, publishing over 3,000 new articles a day.

Media per Expertise Level and News Sensitivity.

TrustedOut uniquely profiles media per level of expertise (Dedicated > Specialized > Covered > All) AND per profiling period (past week, past month, past quarter). This profiling period identifies News sensitivity. Past week is more sensitive to the latest news, while Past Quarter is more stable. This is very convenient depending on the type of project you’re driving.

Reminder:

  • Media: unique domains used (xxxx.yyy)
  • Sources: unique feeds belonging to a Media. Mostly correspond to a section of the Media
  • Articles per day: number of articles published and analyzed by TrustedOut
  • Archived articles: Article abstracts and links archived on the corresponding Sources.

For the US:

For France:

Lifestyle media market shares in the US and France

Stability over a month and a huge number of articles per day and archived, meaning using a Corpus over a month should be considered to cop with the industry evolutions.

Lifestyle is more covered in the US

As shown in the tables above, at all level of expertise, the US have a lot more media covering this industry than France, which confirms what we see in our Media Coverage Market Shares US vs France – Source TrustedOut – 10/01/19

Related group classifications.

In the US, Lifestyle Media also cover:

In the US, Media covering Lifestyle in the past quarter also cover:

Radar view:

DNA view:

Mouse over to zoom

In France, Lifestyle Media also cover:

In France, Media covering Lifestyle in the past quarter also cover:

Radar view:

DNA view:

Mouse over to zoom

In both countries, Lifestyle and Culture & Arts are close, but France has Culture & Arts above Lifestyle when the US, it is the reverse.
Entertainment & Leisure are 3rd in the US and 4th in France, while Sports is 3rd in France and 5th in the US.
Specific to a country are: Society and Education, only, in the US and Economy & Enterprise and Transportation, only, in France.
Finally, in the US, Lifestyle is strongly attached to Food and Beverage.

Fine tuning your Corpus

Example: Want Lifestyle but NOT Food and Beverage AND NOT Food and Beverage Services

As seen above, Lifestyle Media often also cover Food and Beverage. Say, for PR or an ad campaign effort, you want to get Media in Lifestyle BUT NOT either in Food and Beverage or Food and Beverage Services.

Easy. The query to set your Corpus will look like this:

Mouse over to zoom

Of course, we are moving from 3,007 media and 8300 sources to:

A third of Lifestyle media are also covering Food and Beverage or the Food and Beverage Services.

Brand Safety Risk and Toxic Content: None

Mouse over to zoom
Mouse over to zoom

Media covering Lifestyle are not victims of toxic content and Brand Safety Risks.

Digging into top Media.

Example in the US: Chowhound (CBS Interactive)

Name Chowhound
Website https://www.chowhound.com/
Feeds

Political orientation is not significant enough to classify this media.

Classification over past Quarter

Trends

Example in France: Elle

Name Elle
Website http://www.elle.fr/
Feeds

Classification over past Quarter

Political orientation is not significant enough to classify this media.

Trends

How our AI-powered classification works

How our AI-powered classification works.

Now you can trust decisions made on content you trust

Importance for Business Intelligence:
No trust, no Intelligence.

Works on all sectors.

Say you are in the food market and want to understand how some cuisine types are perceived amongst specialized publications in America:

To feed your intelligence tools, such as Digimind (demo here), your Corpus will look like this.

Say you are in the food market and want to understand how some cuisine types are perceived amongst specialized publications in America:

To feed your intelligence tools, such as Digimind (demo here), your Corpus will look like this.

16,000+ sources (49k new articles abstracts a day) will ensure you analyze, and thus base your strategic decisions, on content you define.

Would you have thought Better Homes and Gardens would be part of your Corpus? At first, Home and Garden does not sound like Food and beverage specialist, does it? (well, if you are looking for Chicken recipes, it’s here).

This anecdote is to point out the need for both an unbiased and universal classification and a depth of expertise from the content you will base your decisions on.

It is critical you trust the right, and all the right, publications to trust any intelligence coming out of those publications. Depth and width.

No Trust, No Intelligence.

Consequently, the solution is to:

1/ Have marketers define their Corpus from profiles of media they trust for each analysis, each product, each segment, each brand.
And align in each country.

2/ Have those corpuses automatically built, maintained and updated, directly serving your analytics tool.

Bottom line: Define the content you trust so you can trust decisions you make.
“If it’s not trusted in, it can not be trusted out!”

Importance for Advertising:
Brand Safety and Budget Optimization.

Here, you want to advertise your new product to the US Food Market. Keeping your brand safe will be your top priority… After all, you will pay to increase your business, not ruin the brand reputation it took you years to build.

Brand Safety is top priority for CEOs and CMOs.

For your online ad campaign, the trading desk of your advertising agency will define the query, with, amongst other things, desired and not-desired keywords, to select the content you trust compatible with your brand.

But a page can match all those criteria but be published on a site not safe or compatible with the advertiser’s brand. You must also select the publications you trust compatible with your brand.

Otherwise, your brand is at risk. And advertisers know and fear it:

4 in 10 brands deliver ads on unsafe sites – Cision

The only solution for the CMO to be certain to keep brands safe: Define himself the lists of publications he trusts compatible with her/his brands.

Consequence:

70% implement black or white lists… – Digiday

But while the vast majority is using lists, the vast majority is unhappy with the solution. As of today:

… but 64% fear negative impacts on performance.  71% fear to not achieve reach while delivering to the right audience in the right context. – Cision

Consequently, the solution is to:

1/ Have marketers define their white lists themselves for each campaign, each brand. And align in each country.

2/ Have those lists automatically built, maintained and updated, directly serving the trading desk.

Bottom line: Keep your Brand Safe, let TrustedOut manage your white lists.

Let’s go back to our US Food Market example. Our marketer, here, wants to build a white list of US based publications, specialized in Food and Beverage and also wants them to be in business for more than 3 years, not politically, nor religiously oriented and, of course, not spotted as fake news, hate news or junk science.

Corpus looks like above and now more than 9,000+ sources are immediately available to be imported or live feeding your trading desk.

Trading desk runs its query within the perimeter of the white list. Best of both worlds, search and directory.
Brand is now totally safe.

Run more where it returns more.

In addition, Media Profiles bring ad budget optimization.

By adding media profiles to a campaign report, marketers and agencies can surface media with the best ROI and thus, increase budgets where return is optimal.

BHG works best for your campaign? Let’s get more of this profile and spend your ad budget where it makes the most sense.

Matter of fact, Your business is all about the content you trust.

Your business is all about the content you trust.

Questions? Contact us!

 

De Ligonnes arrest. Fake News vs True Mistake.

The news of the De Ligonnes arrest, and then the news it was not De Ligonnes triggered lots of comments about Fake news being everywhere.

“The opportunity was too good” (to be true?) as wrote the Huffington Post (in French)

“Fake news” vs “true mistake”.

The difference between a fake news and true mistake is the driving intention and the transparency in fixing it.

We all know the competition between news publishers. The dilemma between scoops and stories. The balance between publishing too fast and being too late.

Like with any person you trust, it’s ok to make mistakes as long as it was not intentional and you’ve learn from it and will do your best to not reproduce those misleads. A fake news is intentional and if proven and not fixed, will destroy the confidence and the trust in the publisher.

Question you should ask yourself now is: What is my level of trust into media after this episode?

Trust is in the publisher and its brand values.

Trust, like reputation, is built over time. For any business, it’s called Brand values. As Warren Buffett says…

So, it’s no surprise Publishers do not want to lose their reputation and your trust in them for a mistake. The rest – their opinions, their context, who owns them and their agenda – is part of those brand values. They won’t risk to ruin them either.

Bottom line: For the decisions you must make, you must use content from media you trust.

Your business is all about the content you trust.

Want a demo?

Click here to follow our demo

Questions? Contact us!

Media Coverage Market Shares US vs France – Source TrustedOut – 10/01/19

What Media are covering the most.

In the US.

As of today and over the past 90 days, here are the top “covered” group classifications. This means the percentage of media in America covering the following group classification (like a countrywide newsstand shelf)

In bold are the differences above 5%. This means group classification that are more covered in the US vs France.

Top 3 Most topics covered are very different from France

US Media cover much more Entertainment & Leisure, Society and Education and, to a less degree, Sports, Lifestyle and Medecine & Health.

In France.

In bold are the differences above 5%. This means group classification that are more covered in France vs the US.

Greater coverage in Economy & Enterprise and Tech.

French Media cover much more in Economy & Enterprise and Tech which, both, are not even in the Top 10 US.

Largest Media Coverage differences.

As for above, we deliberately put a cliff at 5%.

Comparing Apple to Apple.

Tables above prove coverage between countries are very different, meaning feeding your intelligence tool and creating your whitelists based on random numbers of sources or media or articles will drive to unreliable, dangerous outcomes.

As demonstrated in this business case: Business Case #3. Country comparisons

Questions? Contact us!

 

 

Brand Safety: We could not agree more with Facebook.

From this article, “Facebook urges brands to define their safety tolerances“:

Facebook: Safe < Tolerable < Suitable.

Jon Steinback, Facebook’s director of product marketing for EMEA and global channels, spoke exclusively to WARC to provide more detail about the company’s attempts to create a safer environment for brands.

… Facebook has also introduced a three-tier model for identifying content that is safe, suitable and that brands would be prepared to tolerate. (For more, read the full article: Facebook on why advertisers must understand their own brand safety ‘tolerances’.)

TrustedOut: Safe < Suitable < Consistent

We totally agree with Facebook, and even farther, we believe the true goal for a brand is to be consistent, in July, we wrote:

Brand Consistency > Brand Safety + Brand Suitability

Facebook: “Safe” is the minimum

At the most basic level, Facebook promises to keep all brands “safe” from the most offensive material with its content “floor”, policed by its enforcement teams and technology.

We agree again. This is the basis level. Mostly made of keywords.

TrustedOut: Is “basic” enough for your brand?

Of course not.

Brand Safety, the most misleading proxy for quality that an advertiser can use.

Facebook: define their own “tolerances”, and create a media strategy

“… the social network is urging brands to define their own “tolerances”, and create a media strategy that is harmonious with campaign goals and business aims.”

Agreed. Of course. Keywords are not enough.

Mandatory need for brand values tolerances. And brand values are perceived. This can not be dealt with this keywords. Entering perceptions.

And perceptions made by humans are biased, not up to date and not universal on all matters. Must be done by a machine. A machine taught with myriads of  content… Here we are.

TrustedOut: Tolerance controlled via Whitelisting definition.

Here starts TrustedOut’s Corpus Intelligence.
Here starts the need to define the “tolerance” limits on what your brand can support.
Here starts the whitelisting definition, as large as tolerable by your brand for a campaign.

Facebook: Suitable. safety is not being in a situation that can be embarrassing.

“Then it also encourages advertisers to consider the kinds of content which one might not categorize as offensive, but which are likely to jar when appearing alongside a particular type of brand.

“For some people, safety is not being in a situation that can be embarrassing for them,” he said. “The important thing for us is that we provide the right level of controls and also that transparency is inherent in this.””

Bingo, This is where TrustedOut excels.

Let us manage, globally, per campaign, all your whitelists. Always updated. Always right.

TrustedOut: Here starts Brand Consistency.

Here starts the brand consistency. Make sure your brand is consistent everywhere, all the time.
Here starts the fine tuning of the alignment of your brand for a campaign, a product, a target and media publishers.
Here starts the benefit of the publisher’s brand value for your brand. The publisher is no longer a space to advertise but an echo chamber for your brand.
Here advertising is not only pushing for a message, it strengthens what has the most critical value for your business: your brand.

Time for a Whitelisting demo?

Questions? Shoot!

The ultimate brand consistency is to remove the name from the logo.

In a recent article from The Drum, “Why brands such as Doritos and Mastercard are removing the names from their logos

“Extreme, telegraphic simplicity…”

…is very useful in the small and rapidly moving spaces of a device-dependent world. So, if words get in the way, remove them.”

“The harder it gets to connect to younger audiences, the bolder brands will need to become with moves like wordmark removal”

“It is noticeable that it requires bold creative leadership from both the client and agency to take those risks.”

Why would you risk your brand consistency at any stage in advertising?

Yes, removing the name from the logo is the ultimate step, the dream case, the results of years of consistency in building your brand.

The first step to achieving consistent branding is realizing that you have to ultimately gain control of your branding so that everyone is singing from the same song sheet. [source]

Is your brand consistent?

“An inconsistent brand is a confusing and unreliable brand. These are traits that drive customers away, not attract them. ” says Crowdspring, “If your brand constantly changes, it’s hard for customers or clients to wrap their minds around what it’s about. And, it’s even harder to gain trust, confidence and customer loyalty.”

Why would you compromise a hard and long gained brand consistency by advertising on media not consistent with your brand?

“Your brand promises must be consistent with the reality of your customers’ brand experience.

Every company has a brand identity.

This is true for your company whether you’ve made a single conscious branding decision or not.

And that’s why it’s vitally important to make conscious, consistent branding choices. The decisions left unmade, and a brand left untended may hurt your business.” [source]

TrustedOut secures your Brand and preserves your Brand Consistency.

Questions? Contact us!

 

 

Do Commerce AND, NOT OR, Branding. (and fix brand safety, risky SEO et al)

We could not agree more with the “Father of Advertising”.

(David Mackenzie Ogilvy CBE was an advertising tycoon, founder of Ogilvy & Mather, and known as the “Father of Advertising”.  – Wikipedia)

Commerce and Branding are vital to any business. Both of them. Equally.

So, when one takes over the other one, it hurts your business.

That’s what we have with examples like Brand Safety or too mechanical SEO (Search Engine Optimization). Of course, everybody wants to maximize sales. No debate. But unreasonable actions, desperate measures will hurt your reputation and consequently your brand. And as Warren Buffet says:

“It takes 20 years to build a reputation and 5 minutes to ruin it, if you think about that, you’ll do things differently”

Brand safety risk is pushing (too far) exposure into unsafe territories for the brand.

If your sole motivation is to have the highest number of ad placements with little to no overseeing on who’s hosting your brand, you’re due to a brand safety violation. And it may be costly to your brand reputation and thus, your business.

Would you risk your brand values on poor quality coasters or ugly marcoms? So, why risking them by exposing your brand with a publisher not compatible with the value of your brand?

Brand safety is a matter of “where” AND “who”.

Where is the brand exposed, meaning the matter of the page hosting your brand. Here programmatic is key to build a black list of words you want to avoid.

Who is exposing your brand, meaning the profile of the publisher. And, this profile must be compatible with your brand value. Here TrustedOut is key to build a white list of media publishers you want to keep your brand safe and consistant.

Another example: Site content and SEO.

The same “commerce and, not or, branding” applies to the content you produce for your site or the pages made for SEO.

Twisting incautiously SEO may put your brand at risk.

By adding or removing keywords to please Google and get more traffic may spoil your brand perception. After all, if content makes (or break) your brand, your own content applies first hand. Think of your site, as a media publisher. After all, this is where you expose your brand.

To read next:
> Whitelisting with TrustedOut
> Your Business is all about content.

Questions? Contact us!

Brand Safety Crisis Can Prompt Consumer Backlash Against Brand

In this article, MarTechSeries comments a survey conducted by the Trustworthy Accountability Group (TAG) and Brand Safety Institute (BSI). Hereafter are our takeaways:

Customers have a broad definition of “Brand Safety”

“The survey also discovered that consumers define brand safety broadly, including issues such as ad-related piracy and malware, as well as those involving ad placement around inappropriate content.”

“Inappropriate” content has a very personal definition…

As discussed in previous posts for Fake News: What is fake for someone is not fake for others. Take Homeopathy. Some believes in it, others do not.  The same applies to “inappropriate”. Some people believe a content is inappropriate, others won’t. Like for Rap lyrics for example.

Brand means values and values are emotions.

… but, for a very large majority,  has negative impacts. On everyone involved.

From the article:

Advertisers responsibility

  • Large majorities of respondents said advertisers should prevent their ads from running near hate speech (73 percent), pornographic content (73 percent), violent content (70 percent), and illegal drug-related content (69 percent).
  • More than half of respondents said that advertisers should prevent their ads from running near stolen/pirated movies or TV shows (53 percent) and unsafe or hacked websites (73 percent).
  • Less than half of respondents said advertisers should prevent their ads from running near gambling-related content (43 percent) or controversial political views (41 percent).

Majority says negative impacts are real.

  • The overwhelming majority of respondents (90 percent) said it was very or somewhat important for advertisers to make sure their ads don’t appear near dangerous, offensive, or inappropriate content.
  • If respondents discovered ads for a product they regularly buy had appeared next to racist Neo-Nazi propaganda, 87 percent said they would reduce their spending on that product, and 58 percent said they would stop buying it altogether.
  • If respondents discovered such ads next to terrorist recruiting videos, 90 percent would reduce their spending on the product advertised, and 67 percent would stop buying it altogether.
  • If respondents discovered such ads on a website promoting illegal activities such as stolen videos and other content, 82 percent would reduce their spending on the product advertised, and 45 percent would stop buying it altogether.
  • If respondents discovered such an ad had infected their computer or mobile device with malware, 93 percent would reduce their spending on the product advertised, and 73 percent would stop buying it altogether.

Everybody is accounted responsible: Advertiser, Ad Agency, Publisher, Ad Tech.

  • When asked who should be responsible for ensuring ads do not run with dangerous, offensive, or inappropriate content, respondents assigned responsibility broadly, with 70 percent naming the advertiser, 68 percent the ad agency, 61 percent the website owner, and 46 percent the technology provider.

Bottom line:

* Your Brand, to be truly safe, must be compatible with the brand of the publisher, or any support.

* This can only be done via AI profiling as it must be Unbiased, Universal and always Up-to-date.

* This can not be done by keyword-based queries. Keywords in a page don’t profile brand values.

TrustedOut’s solution for Brand Safety in 1 slide:

Questions? Contact us!

 

 

 

Your business is all about the content you trust.

Image Credit: SEOMarketing

Knowledge from Content makes or breaks any future.

Applies to individuals but also organizations and businesses, of all sizes and sorts.

We are our Education.
So is your Business.

What we are depends on the education we were given. Need proof?
MIT scientists created a “psychopath” AI by feeding it violent content from Reddit

Same applies to any Businesses. Your Business is how it was educated.

No Trust in Content,  No Trust in business future.

Trust in Content is the #1 vital condition to any business.

1st, define the content you trust, 2nd, feed all business decision and education processes with it.

Trust in Content is not a nice to have, it’s a vital, critical, mandatory must have. Tools are fed with Content. No matter how your tools are, fed with poor content, the smartest tools and the smartest operator of those tools will produce poor performances. Is it what you want for your business?

No trust in content, no need for any tools otherwise it would be, not only a waste of time and money, but a very dangerous way to make bet on your business future.

It all starts with content you trust.

  1. Define the content you need
  2. Create your Corpus with TrustedOut and get the corresponding Media, Sources and Articles abstracts and links
  3. Now, Feed all your tools with content you trust

 

Corpus Intelligence for every segment of your business.

Hereafter is an example of an Enterprise organized by Industry. Also applies to any other type of business organization.

Want to give it a try?
Contact us!

 

Brand Safety, the most misleading proxy for quality that an advertiser can use.

This post is our takeaways from this AdExchanger article.

Brand Safety Is Not Synonymous With Quality.

“I find brand safety one of the most baffling contradictions of our industry. It often represents the exact opposite situation in which any quality media owner should want to put itself, and it is the most misleading proxy for quality that an advertiser can use.

As programmatic RTB grew, quantity gained priority over quality, and everybody fell into the trap. Advertisers pursued a delusional quest for unlimited scale, blinded by the illusion of a perfect cross-device, cross-domain view of the user. Quality media brands dangerously allowed themselves to be thrown into a big bucket with almost every type of inventory, ranging from fake to garbage on up to the top of the premium content pyramid: their own.”

A “lifecycle of rubbish”

“As a result, marketers saw their ads run on sites and apps that, at worst, promoted hate speech, terrorism, pedophilia, violence and even harmed the users’ devices, and, at best, alongside very low-quality content and environments with horrible UX.

When these problems surfaced, advertisers should have demanded that the programmatic platforms remove the rubbish at the source, which could have fixed the roots of the issue (but it also would have threatened the potential revenue for ad tech and agencies and the illusion of scale). Instead, advertisers barked without biting and deployed systems to filter out as much of that rubbish as possible, adding further costs to the system.

This created a “lifecycle of rubbish,” flowing in and out by design.”

The obsession with brand safety is taken to an extreme, while advertisers willingly join an environment plagued by the worst possible problems in marketing and advertising.

“One could think that the introduction of brand safety tools was the point where premium media owners finally won, with their quality inventory highlighted, protected and made available to premium brands. This is where the painful path took a slightly different twist instead.

In addition to the sites or apps that no respectable business would want to be associated with, advertisers started to include in their blacklists terms and topics predominantly focused on current facts and news, such as Trump, Brexit or #MeToo. This practice also existed for decades in print but with a much more reasonable and balanced approach.

These topics are part of perfectly safe and balanced pieces of content when belonging to quality media environments, but in this “brand safety” era they are all to be carefully avoided.

Programmatic RTB triggered a brand safety paranoia, but it’s a paradox: The obsession with brand safety is taken to an extreme, while advertisers willingly join an environment plagued by the worst possible problems in marketing and advertising.

The result is ads from some of the top advertisers often being displayed, by exclusion, on “safe content” like silly polls, competitions or otherwise bland content of little quality and engagement. At the same time, quality media owners complain that a good amount of premium content is automatically filtered out by brand safety algorithms, affecting their revenue.”

A great opportunity for visionary advertisers and media owners.

“There is a great opportunity for visionary advertisers and media owners who understand that infinite scale is not only impossible but even counterproductive. There would be enough reach in a media environment that is high quality, walled garden-like, brand safe by nature and user-centric – separate from the programmatic open marketplace and complementary to Google and Facebook.

The industry’s marketing and advertising pitches constantly cite the customer experience at the forefront of their promises, but let’s stop fooling ourselves, our clients and our partners.”

More than Brand Safety, Brand Consistency.

Brand Consistency > Brand Safety + Brand Suitability

With TrustedOut: Manage unbiased, AI-built Whitelists. Centrally.

Questions? Contact-us!

2019: Brand awareness is Marketers top priority.

According to the 2019 “State of Digital Advertising” released by Marin Software, Brand awareness is Marketers top priority in 2019.

  • Brand awareness – 25%
  • Enhancing the customer experience – 22%
  • Embracing omnichannels – 20%
  • Delivering personalization – 20%
  • Campaign management – 19%

Building Brand Awareness Requires a Consistent Brand Experience.

As written in this article, “the psychological reason why  brand consistency is is important”:

“First and foremost, brand consistency is about trust, and establishing it works like this:

In order for people to trust you, they have to feel like they know you
In order for them to feel like they know you, they must be aware of you, recognize you, and remember you
In order for people to recognize and remember you, you must show up in a way that’s consistent”

TrustedOut builds and preserves your Brand Consistency:

  • Manage lists from AI-profiled sources. Unbiased. Universal. Up-to-date.
  • Feed directly ad delivery systems 24/7/365.
  • Align centrally all lists per brands, regions, campaigns.
  • Optimize budgets using media profiles to detect most efficient media.

Questions? Contact us!

Do not let advertising compromise your brand consistency.

The first step to achieving consistent branding is realizing that you have to ultimately gain control of your branding so that everyone is singing from the same song sheet. [source]

Is your brand consistent?

“An inconsistent brand is a confusing and unreliable brand. These are traits that drive customers away, not attract them. ” says Crowdspring, “If your brand constantly changes, it’s hard for customers or clients to wrap their minds around what it’s about. And, it’s even harder to gain trust, confidence and customer loyalty.”

Why would you compromise a hard and long gained brand consistency by advertising on media not consistent with your brand?

“Your brand promises must be consistent with the reality of your customers’ brand experience.

Every company has a brand identity.

This is true for your company whether you’ve made a single conscious branding decision or not.

And that’s why it’s vitally important to make conscious, consistent branding choices. The decisions left unmade, and a brand left untended may hurt your business.” [source]

TrustedOut secures your Brand and preserves your Brand Consistency.

Contact us!

 

 

Economy and Enterprise – US vs France Taxonomies.

France’s Economy and Enterprise Taxonomy.

Let’s ask TrustedOut, for France, what is the Taxonomy of all media covering the “Economy and Enterprise” Classification group over the past 7 days.

Here’s the corpus query:

Showing 373 Medias and 750 sources

and the taxonomy DNA:

USA’s Economy and Enterprise Taxonomy.

Let’s ask TrustedOut, for the US, what is the Taxonomy of all media covering the “Economy and Enterprise” Classification group over the past 7 days.

Here’s the corpus query:

Showing 1,961 Medias and 3,645 sources

and the taxonomy DNA:


Comparisons:

France USA
General, 43.6% General, 41.9%
General > Economy and Enterprise, 20.2% General > Economy and Enterprise, 21.5%
General > Economy and Enterprise > Economy, 6.2%
General >  Finance, 5.2% General >  Finance, 5.4%
General >  Law, 6.5%
General > Tech, 8% General > Tech, 8%
Industries, 22.2% Industries, 19.1%
Sciences, 6.7% Sciences, 7.7%
People, 27.3% People, 31.2%
People > Culture and Arts, 7.3%
People > Sports, 6.6%
People > Lifestyle, 5.9%

How to read the table above: The percentage means how much of the classification datasets are in the publication. Ex: In the US,  media covering Economy and Enterprise have also 5.9% have words belonging to the classification Lifestyle which is part of People.

In France, media covering “Economy and Enterprise” also talk:

Deeper in Economy
Law
Culture and Arts
Sports

While, in the US, media covering “Economy and Enterprise” also talk:

Lifestyle

Fine tuning your corpus to compare apple to apple.

Want to compare countries for a product launch but do not want the Lifestyle classification in the US?

Simple add the IS NOT Lifestyle taxonomy:

Voila. Now run your analytics on those 2 corpuses or/and Get the corresponding whitelists…

Questions? Contact us!

 

 

France: People trusts almost twice more someone they know than news media

According to Ipsos, information from a acquaintance inspires almost twice as much confidence as information from a media outlet, according to Ipsos.

French trusts way less.

Trust for France vs Others:
37% vs 49% for Radio and TV,
36% vs 46% for newspapers and magazines,
30% vs 45% for online information.

64% do trust someone they know.

Beyond the question: “where do those people they know get the information”, we can also link this ratio of “twice trust when I know” clearly visible in this chart

Finding trusted sources is the foundation of TrustedOut:

A database of AI-profiled Media.

”For analytics and brand safety,
what’s not Trusted In, can not be Trusted Out.”

Questions? Let us know!

 

 

65% of Britain’s biggest advertisers are present in non-brand safe environments

This post represents our takeaways from this article.

‘Brand Safety in the UK: Willing to Risk it?’ was commissioned by marketing and media consultancy Ebiquity in partnership with zulu5, focussing exclusively on the world’s third-largest programmatic market.

2/3 of the Top100 advertisers exposed in Q1 2019.

Report (link above) found “Close to two-thirds of Britain’s top 100 advertisers have been exposed to potentially brand unsafeenvironments in the first quarter of 2019 alone.

This report from Ebiquity and Zulu5 recommends:

Take active steps to tackle brand safety and ad fraud. – Ebiquity

“Angus Mclean, director digital, Ebiquity, said: “Our report demonstrates that brand safety is a complex issue that remains highly relevant for many brands, and there isn’t necessarily one standard applicable to all advertisers. Despite continued risks to brands, we believe advertisers can take active steps to tackle brand safety and ad fraud.””

Define what constitutes appropriate and inappropriate content – Ebiquity

“To minimise risks Ebiquity recommends advertisers first define what constitutes appropriate and inappropriate content before implementing their own brand safety standards while actively monitoring and managing campaigns.”

We could not agree more!

As we wrote previously:

Brand Consistency > Brand Safety + Brand Suitability

Solution: Fix Brand Safety with AI-operated WhiteListing.

Questions? Contact us!

 

 

 

They say about nous. [update #2]

Here’s a selection of the feedback we got lately.

Agencies

We met with Franck Farrugia, CEO Omnicom Group France and says about us:

“TrustedOut provides us with what we have been looking for a long time, namely a dynamic construction of secure advertising delivery environments for our advertisers. But this is also far beyond that, since they allow us to select broadcasting environments according to the levels of trust that an audience and a target group grants to content, thus maximizing advertising impact, because more than ever, trust is the major issue in the relationship between brands and consumers. » 

Advertisers

We met Samir, Chief Digital Officer at La Redoute (very large ecommerce site), and he wrote this:

“Yesterday, I met Freddy Mini, a briscard who was CEO of Netvibes;) Now he launches Trustedout and it feels really good to see a StartUp that not only promises a solution that everyone calls for and especially that shows it! It really works!!! Don’t look any further… or at least I found it!”

Searchers and Teachers.

We also met with Fabrice from SciencePo, a famous school and Dominique, who worked for Ecole Polytechnique de Lausanne and SciencePo. Following our meeting, Dominique wrote this: TrustedOut, AI to explain who you trust.

The way TrustedOut deals with the issue of trust seemed to me to be one of the most clever and feasible.

TrustedOut really bluffed me.

But by systematically formalising content descriptors, TrustedOut makes it possible to give applicants the ability to explain their trust criteria,

Government.

We met Eric Bothorel, Deputy of the Côtes d’Armor, at the National Assembly, in charge of Hate Speech questions on the Internet:

I was receiving @TrustedOut (@freddymini @florentsolt): a promising solution #DeepLearning to ensure the presence of brands in relevant places and safe trustedout.com
➡️What if the solution to no longer finance hate sites was French?
#HateSpeech

More to come soon… Stay tuned.

And as usual, feel free to contact us if you have questions!

 

 

Fine tuning your corpus to perfect analytics and build brand consistent whitelists.

Let’s have a look at some cool product updates our alpha-testers can enjoy since last night.

Demo scenario: Let say we want to create a Corpus for the US Food Market for some analytics on our brand and a new ad campaign coming right up.

1/ The broad definition. Country and Taxonomy.

Add country, select United States.

Add Taxonomy IS made of these two classifications :

  • Industry > Manufacturing and Retail > Food and Beverages
  • People > Lifestyle > Food and Beverages Services.

As you know, TrustedOut also profiles the level of expertise and the sensitivity on news for each media over the period of rolling time the taxonomy is computed. Here we want ALL levels and a taxonomy, stable, over the past rolling quarter (-90 days from today). We do recompute and update everything permanently.

We have 4,003 media for our Whitelist and 10,027 sources to feed our analytic tools with.

2/ Refining the target. Excluding a classification.

For this effort, we do not want media specialized in Food Processing, profiled over the same period of time, so we exclude it from our Corpus like this:

  • IS Industry > Manufacturing and Retail > Food and Beverages
  • IS People > Lifestyle > Food and Beverages Services.
  • IS NOT Industry > Agriculture > Food Processing

We now have 487 media and 732 sources.

3/ Hand picking media we do or do not want. By name, by URL.

(this is an example. nothing personal for those sites 🙂

From past experiences, we do not want to work with anything related to foodnavigator.com and its subsidiaries, neither do we want a site named “Food processing”. Clicking on “Get” and Scrolling through the media list TrustedOut gives me, I see they, indeed, are in the list:

Let’s remove them.

Let’s tell our corpus to add the following conditions:

  • Name DOES NOT CONTAIN “Food processing”
  • Website DOES NOT CONTAIN “foodnavigator” in its domain

Voila. 484 media and 726 sources.

Corpus is ready to feed our BI Analytic Tool and be our whitelist to imported in our DSP.

Questions? Shoot!

 

 

Brand Consistency > Brand Safety + Brand Suitability

Brands need more than Safety, more than Suitability.

Last year, 4A’s (the American Association of Advertising Agencies serves 700+ member agencies across 1,300 offices, which control more than 85% of total U.S. advertising spend) announced: ” Advertiser Protection Bureau Delivers Brand Suitability Framework and Brand Safety Floor In Move to Help Advertisers Assess Risk”

… and predicted “the content classifications will streamline the conversations between all parties regarding what placements are appropriate by brand.”

Unsurprisingly, we could not agree more.

“It is time to take brand safety to the third level or ‘brand care’ level…”

says Admantx, and continues “… one that gives far greater prominence to the meaning, context and potential implications of online content, specific to the actual brand’s needs.”

Again, we could not agree more.

That third level or brand care level is Brand Consistency.

Why Brand Consistency is so important?

Consistency Builds Brand Awareness
Brand Consistency Communicates Credibility
Consistency Makes Your Brand More Trustworthy
Consistency Helps Manage Perceptions
Consistency Takes Marketing to a New Level
Consistency Builds Brand Equity

This equity comes in part because of customer loyalty. Access Development gives the statistic that 86% of consumers say that loyalty is driven by trust. Twenty-six percent of consumers specifically call out “consistency” as part of this loyalty.

TrustedOut builds and preserves your Brand Consistency:

  • Manage lists from AI-profiled sources. Unbiased. Universal. Up-to-date.
  • Feed directly ad delivery systems 24/7/365.
  • Align centrally all lists per brands, regions, campaigns.
  • Optimize budgets using media profiles to detect most efficient media.

Contact us!

How our AI-powered classification works.

We receive a lot of questions about how our AI-powered Classification is working, so we decided to make 2 drawings to explain how it works.

1. The Taxonomy.
Gauging the media from the Inside.
Including expertise and sensitivity.

A media has sources which each publishes new articles. From every new article, we solely keep useful words (no stop words such as “the, is, but…”) which we call an “abstract”.

Every single work of this new abstract is matched vs several hundreds of datasets. Every single classification in our taxonomy has its own dataset.

Each 1 million abstracts, this means 75,000,000,000 operations.

This method is close to the tribe model. Every tribe uses a dialect made of words signing this dialect. When you recognize a dialect, you recognize a tribe. Here is a classification. Depending on the number and the weight of words, we are able to gauge the level of expertise in the classification. This gives us a score for the article.

Playing with the length of past days, we can also gauge the sensitivity to news for the sources. Compiling sources tells us where the media stands.

Bottom line: We have a universal taxonomy, always updated and able to be filtered by expertise level and over 3 periods of time to sense time sensitivity (and trend forming, but we’ll tell you more real soon)

2. The Perceptions.
Gauging the media from the Outside.
How is a Media “spotted as”.

“Fake news”, “Junk science”, and other toxic appreciations are tangible. Rarely, can this be intangible (for sure), because those are up to appreciations. What is “fake news” to some people, is not for others. This is why we treat those appreciations as “spotted as”, or “perceived on the internet as”.

Same as for our taxonomy, perception is an appreciation, but where taxonomy is about the publisher itself, we call it the Publisher Inside, the perception is the Publisher Outside, or how the publisher is perceived for those terms.

To do this, we collect how the publisher is perceived on the Internet, strictly excluding any publisher properties.

This gives us pages and words which we match with Perception datasets (one for “fake news”, one for “junk science” and so on) in a similar way explained above.

We then have a score which when above a threshold make the publication “spotted as fake news” for example.

Bottom line: We sense how a publication is perceived as not one person or group can make any universal statement.

Questions? Shoot!

 

Almost 6 in 10 Canadians blame the United States on the effect of fake news in Canada

The survey — conducted by Ipsos on behalf of the Centre of International Governance Innovation — looked to gauge the opinions of 25,000 internet users across the world on internet security and trust. [ref article]

89% of Canadian internet users think social media is the main source of distrust in the internet.

Are you sharing this opinion? 

86% falling for fake news at least once.

And you?

“This year’s survey of global attitudes not only underscores the fragility of the internet, but also netizens’ growing discomfort with social media and the power these corporations wield over their daily lives,” said Fen Osler Hampson, a fellow at CIGI and director of its global security and politics program. 

Importance for Business Intelligence:
No trust, no Intelligence.

Distrust has a toll for individual, but also for businesses. Define Media Profiles You Trust, Get Content You Need.

Deliver Trustworthy and Smarter Social Intelligence.

Can you make strategic decisions on doubtful insights?

Questions? Contact us!

 

“Fake news” means almost nothing.

This post is inspired by this Washington Post article

3 Americans out of 4 believe traditional news organizations report “fake news.”…

This number came from a 2018 Monmouth University poll.

We will not comment or enter in the political argument but focus on the definition of what “fake news” means.

… but what does “fake news” mean?

“When you see the result, you don’t know what it means,” argued Tom Rosenstiel, executive director of American Press Institute, who has a background in polling with Pew Research.

“It could mean stories I don’t like, stories that are critical of a person I like, stories that have a factual error, stories that are fundamentally wrong, or stories made up out of whole cloth by pranksters or political propagandists,” he said.

Are “fake news” “factual coverage I don’t like”?

And if “fake news” includes “factual coverage that I don’t like,” it’s no wonder the negative numbers are so high. If it also includes “editorial decisions” that reflect negatively on a particular officeholder, it’s even less wonder.

It’s not about “fake”, it’s about “your definition of Trust”.

The level of trust on “Media I use” is 50% higher than Media in general.

… and your definition of trust is what TrustedOut is all about.

TrustedOut:
A database of AI-profiled Media.

”For analytics and brand safety,
what’s not Trusted In, can not be Trusted Out.”

Questions? Shoot!

 

People have shifted their trust to the relationships within their control.

Only 1 in 5 believes the system is working, and 1 in 2 thinks the reverse.

In this article, Why The Most Trusted Brands Will Also Be The Most Successful, Which-50 Media writes: “According to the authors (2019 Global Edelman Trust Index), “Trust has changed profoundly in the past year — people have shifted their trust to the relationships within their control.”. Indeed, the study revealed an urgent desire for change. “All [customers] share an urgent desire for change. Only one in five feels that the system is working for them, with nearly half of the mass population believing that the system is failing them.”

Why? Growing distrust in Media and Gov.

Distrust is, both in Media and Gov, and both in Europe and the US.

Reminder: Customers (readers) will give the most value to brands that they trust to do the right thing by them.

1/ Proof: 50% more trust on media I use vs media in general.

While distrust is general, trust definition is personal.

2/ Point: Consumer/reader Trust is Brand value.

Consumer trust is a vital and a key differentiator for publishers

3/ Caution: Hazardous ad placements impact brand value.

Brand Safety Violations: Consumers question brand’s motives.

Bottom line: CMOs must analyze and advertise on sites they trust.

Deliver Trustworthy and Smarter Social Intelligence.

Can you make strategic decisions on doubtful insights?

Fix Brand Safety with AI-operated WhiteListing.

Can you afford to put your brand at risk?

Questions? Contact us!

 

 

 

 

Adding News-Sensitivity in our Taxonomy.

Taxonomy classification over different periods for CNN Politics.

Brand Safety 2.0 is about brand values.

As we wrote in our previous post: “Brand Safety 1.0 was about toxic keywords, 2.0 adds brand values.”

Brand values are tangible. So must be media profiling.

To gauge brand values, which are made of tangible perceptions, the matching publisher brands must be profiled with content classification, using AI to be unbiased, universal and always up-to-date.

Our AI-based Taxonomy and massive data processing already allow universal taxonomy AND expertise depth…

We’ve presented, in previous posts, our universal taxonomy and its DNA view: “Media profiles are key to Business Intelligence and Advertising.”

… announcing today, new-sensitivity in taxonomy!

Playing with periods of time in the past, past week, past month, past quarter, we are now able to classify accordingly our classification and thus, here, our taxonomy.

In other words, depending on the marketeer project and brand values, TrustedOut will be able to deliver news-sensitive or stable media.

No UI yet, but we couldn’t keep this for ourselves, here’s how CNN – Politics looks like over past week, month and quarter.

A quick read is:

International:

… disappears from top 5 over the period of time of the past quarter (-90 days). This might be due Iran and trade war/mexico stuff. Depth is also getting lower with time.

Political party:

… goes lower with time.

Defense gets civil over time and Education and LGBTQ are very news sensitive. Disappear over time.

New UI and new killer feature coming up…

We will include news-sensibility in our Corpus definition and, teasing again, we’ll reveal a killer features using this brand new and unique capability,

Stay tuned.

Feel free to reach out if you have a question!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brand Safety 1.0 was about toxic keywords, 2.0 adds brand values.

Image result for white list

Challenging the definition of brand safety

In this article, Marketing Dive writes “While the industry settles on what brand safety means, companies are finding fresh ways to define the idea based on their individual values” and goes on:

“Brand safety is a highly nuanced concept, largely because each brand has a unique view as to what constitutes a safe ad placement.”

We could not agree more.

Articles add 2 interesting cases:

“The definition of controversial content also differs by brand, as illustrated by Nike’s decision to feature Colin Kaepernick in its 30th anniversary campaign last year. This contentious move was beneficial for Nike because the actions of the former San Francisco 49ers quarterback align with the brand’s progressive values, as demonstrated in the campaign slogan “Believe in something. Even if it means sacrificing everything.” A brand with more traditionalist or conservative values would steer clear of content relating to a controversial sports star for fear of damaging its reputation.

Equally, a brand such as Dick’s Sporting Goods, which took a strong stance in the national gun debate following the Parkland shooting, wouldn’t want to be associated with online content relating to violence or shootings. However, rival retailers that take a different view on the firearms debate may welcome a placement alongside a news story about gun crime to reinforce the need for their products. Ultimately, defining and executing brand safety is about being intentional and acting on a brand’s unique vision and values. This will inevitably be different for each company.”

Brand Safety 2.0 is about Brand values.

Brand Safety 1.0 was about having the brand protected at the content level with a query made of  “must-have” words and the “must-not-have” ones.

The tangible source-based intelligence.

Brand Safety 2.0 is about the brand values of the publisher to be in line with the brand values of the advertiser. This is tangible and requires evaluations.

Those evaluations must be unbiased, universal and always up-to-date. And to not be too limitative, have to be large and broadly cover a desired market. Consequently, only AI, Machine Learning can deliver and maintain this. No human curation can do and must not do.

We name this, Corpus Intelligence. The Corpus representing all materials used for a project: analytics, marketing, PR…

By providing desired and user-defined trustworthy content, Corpus Intelligence is the vital complement to any piece of content crunch, such as social intelligence (to feed products like Digimind, Synthesio, IBM Watson…) and Online Advertising Whitelisting (to feed trading desks, ad delivery platforms…)

An example? Let’s take MarketingDive.com

Let’s ask TrustedOut how Marketing dive is perceived to gauge what advertiser brand values are compatible? Here are the taxonomy classifications:

  • Top Categories
    General › Economy And Enterprise
    General › Economy And Enterprise › Marketing
    General › Economy And Enterprise › Advertising
    Industries › Information And Communication › Online Media
  • Specialized
    People › Lifestyle › Food And Beverage
    General › Tech › Digital Tech
  • Spotted as
    Fake News › No

Consequently, if your brand has values matching the above, MarketingDive.com will be in the whitelist TrustedOut will build for you and will feed your ad delivery platform. Within this whitelist, your programmatic query will add keywords selections.

Whitelisting and programmatic queries, both, make your brand totally safe.

Questions? Contact-us!

 

 

“It takes 20 years to build a reputation and 5 minutes to ruin it…

… if you think about that, you’ll do things differently” – Warren Buffett

Warren Buffett’s quote applies straight to Brand Safety.

In this article from Which-50 Media, “Three Simple Steps For Implementing Programmatic Brand Safety“, Which-50 Media writes:

“The rapid adoption of omnichannel marketing executed through programmatic media buying has brought the challenges of brand safety, ad fraud, and viewability into sharp relief… It also put the programmatic advertising industry under scrutiny too, prompting a backlash from big media agencies and large brands, predominantly from the UK and US, to suspend their advertising with Google, with countless advertisers quickly jumping on the bandwagon.”

Advertising to be displayed alongside published content aligned with brands and customers’ values.

Yes, we agree with Which-50 when they say: “At the advertiser level, it prompted brands to question how they could ensure that their display advertising ran alongside published content that aligned with both their brand’s and their customers’ values.”

To do so, Which-50 lists 3 steps: Define programmatic brand safety, White and black listings and Private marketplace. On that part, we believe 2 and 3 can be combined with a greater White listing capability. So, 2 parts. Really:

Fixing both, the intangible and tangible.

The intangible keyword-based intelligence.

The brand, to be protected at the content level, a query must be made of keywords to ensure the “must-have” words and the “must-not-have” ones.

This is protect from the intangible, not arguable, environnement incompatible with the brand.

Example: an airline will not want to be near a crash. A query with unwanted keywords related to plane crashes will eliminate those pages. That’s Which-50 1st step. We agree.

The tangible source-based intelligence.

The second part is the brand values of the publisher been in line with the brand values of the advertiser. This is tangible and requires evaluations.

Those evaluations must be unbiased, universal and always up-to-date. And to not be too limitative, have to be large and broadly cover a desired market. Consequently, only AI, Machine Learning can deliver and maintain this. No human curation can do and must not do.

In our example above, the airline might be super high end and only want to appear in upper class lifestyle publications, or the reverse, target popular categories. Might also want to reach out to a special type of profile, like people interested in specialized publications like Law or Automotive…

We name this, Corpus Intelligence. The Corpus representing all materials used for a project: analytics, marketing, PR…

By providing desired and user-defined trustworthy content, Corpus Intelligence is the vital complement to any piece of content crunch, such as social intelligence (to feed products like Digimind, Synthesio, IBM Watson…) and Online Advertising Whitelisting (to feed trading desks, ad delivery platforms…)

Fix Brand Safety with AI-operated WhiteListing.

Can you afford to put your brand at risk?

Questions? Contact us!

 

“It’s a good business, where you write for them.” [updated]

Credits: pexels.com

$4,700,000,000 made by Google from the news industry in 2018.

The study, containing analysis conducted by experts at strategy and economics consulting firm Keystone Strategy and written by the News Media Alliance, and relayed by the New York Times claims Google received an estimated $4.7 billion in revenue in 2018 from crawling and scraping news publishers’ content – without paying the publishers for that use.

The amount of news in Google search results ranges from 16 to 40 percent. Traffic to news publisher raised by 25%.

According to the report, since January 2017, traffic from Google Search to news publisher sites has risen by more than 25 percent to approximately 1.6 billion visits per week in January 2018.

Corresponding with consumers’ shift toward Google for news consumption.

News is becoming increasingly important to Google.

2 impacts:

1/ Saving journalism is of mutual interests.

Google and facebook represents 80% of the advertising market. Earlier this year, we wrote this post.

Saving journalism. [updated 2/19/19]

2/ Profiling media is even more crucial.

Google Search or News may send you to publishers that are not within your definition of trust.

TrustedOut is not, at this point, as B2C offer but for B2B, marketing professionals must, even more carefully, do their analytics and select their ad campaign white lists within their selection of trust and be influenced by Google Search, nor Google News. As we say:

If it’s not trusted in, it can not be trusted out.

Deliver Trustworthy and Smarter Social Intelligence.

Can you make strategic decisions on doubtful insights?

Fix Brand Safety with AI-operated WhiteListing.

Can you afford to put your brand at risk?

Update: Dependence on Google?

CCN is Shutting Down after Google’s June 2019 Core Update

Questions? Contact us!

 

Brand Safety Violations: Consumers question brand’s motives.

Wonder what a brand safety violation means for your customers or prospects? This article from Marketing Dive explains:

Consumers believe brands intentionally place ads next to unsafe content, study says

Why? Because…

People believe advertisers picked where their ads will be placed.

“When people see online ads, they assume the advertiser picked that location intentionally. But that’s typically not the case. Even though organizations rarely select where web ads appear, ads paired with what your members may consider inappropriate content can have a nasty impact on your association’s brand, according to Daniel Avital, chief strategy officer at security and brand-safety firm CHEQ.” says this article on AssociationsNow

“75% of companies report being exposed to brand safety issues, but only 26% have taken some kind of action, and 15% haven’t adjusted their strategies at all.” – MarketingDive

“Seventy-five percent of companies report being exposed to brand safety issues, but only 26% have taken some kind of action, and 15% haven’t adjusted their strategies at all, according to research by GumGum and Custom. Another study by Sizmek found that four in 10 brands report delivering ads on unsafe websites, but 64% find it tough to implement an effective brand safety strategy, and 64% think achieving brand safety can negatively impact how quickly a campaign optimizes.”

“Whitelisting, which only allows ads to be placed in approved environments, may in fact be the best brand safety insurance.” – AdWeek

But, as Marketing Dive adds: “A simple solution is for associations to blacklist certain websites, so ads can’t appear on them, and then to whitelist sites they consider safe. While this is better than an approach that takes no precautions, Avital says new sites can always crop up that aren’t on the blacklist. And whitelisting severely limits the sites that ads can appear on, meaning organizations may not be reaching the people they would like to.”

The solution: Whitelisting from TrustedOut’s AI-Profiled Media database. Safe, large, unbiased, universal, up-to-date:

Related post:

Media profiles are key to Business Intelligence and Advertising. [updated]

Questions? Contact us!

 

54.6% US CMOs reviewed their agency relationships because of Brand Safety

Credits: eMarketer

The Brand Safety Dilemma.

In its report, eMarketing writes: “Virtually all brands are making changes in how they operate in digital media to be safer going forward. This includes demanding more transparency and investing more ad dollars in quality environments.”

We could not agree more.

TrustedOut offers to fix Brand Safety with its AI-Operated Whitelisting.

Question? Contact us!

 

Is the open web in danger?

In this post we’ll be sharing our takeaways from a recent AdAge article: OPINION: THE CLOSED NATURE OF THE OPEN WEB

Few have become the gatekeepers for the many, both in terms of information and advertising..”

We highly recommend reading the article but, let’s jump straight to the opinion exposed for today: “Right now, the few have become the gatekeepers for the many, both in terms of information and advertising. From the information standpoint, alarms have been sounded, and players in Washington have begun discussing possible breakups of big tech in earnest. So where are the alarms on the advertising side?”

For the information part, we agree.

As we wrote in a previous post:

Saving journalism. [updated 2/19/19]

Trust, Media and Democracy

For the advertising part: Do not put all your Advertising eggs in the same Social Networks baskets.

We were sensitive to 3 arguments:

“…rewarding harmful content while decreasing the funding for quality journalism.”

“The fueling of unsafe environments
When advertising on the major tech platforms, advertisers are valuing all content the same, whether it’s high-quality journalism or user-generated rants. In doing so, they fuel the unsafe moments they are trying to avoid. The irony is that many advertisers are only willing to pause their YouTube spends, but they’ll fully eliminate advertising around quality news content—rewarding harmful content while decreasing the funding for quality journalism.”

Is a Social Network context, the most appropriate for your brand message?

“Proper context
If you’re only advertising on Facebook (or Google, Amazon, you name it), then you’re only reaching an audience when they’re in their Facebook (or Google, Amazon, etc.) mindset. And that’s perhaps not the mindset most conducive to your messaging and goals. On the open web, advertisers can target their ads not only by audience, but also around high-value, relevant content that puts a halo around their brands. Quite simply, contextual advertising works. When consumers see messaging that is relevant to their interests, in the moment that they’re indulging those interests, that messaging is far more likely to resonate.

Valuing social engagement over brand engagement.

“Negative brand value
The very design of these platforms is intended to strip away brand. People don’t say, “I saw a GM ad.” They say, “I saw a Facebook ad.” These platforms’ greatest trick has been to get CMOs to value social engagement over brand engagement. This is the exact opposite of what advertising is supposed to accomplish.

Mandatory Source Profile:
According to TrustedOut AI-Operated Taxonomy, AdAge is:

Specialized in:
General › Economy And Enterprise › Marketing
Industries › Information And Communication › Online Media
Industries › Manufacturing And Retail › Consumer Goods
People › Entertainment And Leisure › TV And Video And WebTV
People › Lifestyle › Food And Beverage

What do you think? Let us know!

 

Need for Media Profiles Lists? Unilever agrees.

[click to read article]

[Source and credits: AdAge]

On Monday, we wrote:

Media profiles are key to Business Intelligence and Advertising.

Unilever launches “Trusted Publisher” list.

AdAge writes: “Unilever is launching a Trusted Publishers network that goes beyond the standard audience-verification, anti-fraud and brand-safety guidelines of most marketer ‘whitelists.'”

“Both the publishers and the criteria will be continuously re-assessed”

“We’re aiming to have as many publishers as possible, but they need to go through these selection criteria,” DiComo says. Both the publishers and the criteria will be continuously re-assessed, he says, “because the space is moving so quickly.”

Unilever’s initiative is logic.

Knowing: 4 in 10 brands deliver ads on unsafe sites – Cision

Consequently: 70% implement black or white lists…

… but 64% fear negative impacts on performance.  71% fear to not achieve reach while delivering to the right audience in the right context. – Cision & Digiday

Consequently, the solution is to:

1/ Have marketers define their white lists themselves for each campaign, each brand. And align in each country.

2/ Have those lists automatically built, maintained and updated, directly serving the trading desk.

Bottom line: Keep your Brand Safe, let TrustedOut manage your white lists.

Watch a demo.

Contact us:

 

 

Media profiles are key to Business Intelligence and Advertising. [updated]

Example of a taxonomy DNA: BHG.com
Mouse over to zoom

Click to zoom

Media profiling:
Collection and Classification.

TrustedOut profiles media via data collection to gather intangible data and content classification to evaluate expertise and perception.

Data collection.

From a domain, here for our example, bhg.com, TrustedOut will collect a lot of intangible data such as: its name: Better Homes and Gardens, the owner, here, Meredith Corporation, the organization type, here it’s a Private company, find if content orientations are declared, here, no political, no religious orientations, the online traffic, the revenue, the number of employees, etc, etc…

All those informations are important when defining what the analyst, the CMO, the ad agency, trust, and want to base intelligence, fully ensure brand safety, understand who’s receptive to a message, a promotion, etc…

Content classification.

Content classification is used primarily for our taxonomy and to understand how an information source is perceived, like “spotted as” fake news, junk science, conspiracy theory…

Here’s how it works:

Mouse over to zoom

Let’s have look at BHG.com’s taxonomy.

As described above, our AI-operated taxonomy permanently assesses where the site is good at, meaning non only, the subjects covered, but also, the level of expertise.

Another view of BHG.com’s taxonomy is below with the top classification level and a drill down on this top level, here: People.

Our taxonomy tells us BHG is Specialized in:

People
People › Entertainment And Leisure
People › Entertainment And Leisure › Gardening
People › Entertainment And Leisure › DIY (Do It Yourself)
People › Lifestyle
People › Lifestyle › Food And Beverage (yes! BHG has a recipes section)
People › Lifestyle › Decoration And Design And Architecture Specialized
People › Lifestyle › Home

and BHG covers the following:

People › Society › Family
People › Culture And Arts › Museum And Exhibition
People › Lifestyle › Feminine
People › Culture And Arts › Movies
People › Sports › Gymnastics And Fitness And Yoga
People › Sports › Horse Riding
People › Education › Preschool And Primary School
Sciences › Medicine And Health › Personal Health
Industries › Transportation › Bus

… and BHG has a Limited coverage in:

Sciences › Human Sciences › Sociology

Machine learning operates our Taxonomy and online perception to keep our database of media profiles, unbiased, universal and always up-to-date.

Importance for Business Intelligence:
No trust, no Intelligence.

Say you are in the food market and want to understand how some cuisine types are perceived amongst specialized publications in America:

To feed your intelligence tools, such as Digimind (demo here), your Corpus will look like this.

16,000+ sources (49k new articles abstracts a day) will ensure you analyze, and thus base your strategic decisions, on content you define.

Would you have thought Better Homes and Gardens would be part of your Corpus? At first, Home and Garden does not sound like Food and beverage specialist, does it? (well, if you are looking for Chicken recipes, it’s here).

This anecdote is to point out the need for both an unbiased and universal classification and a depth of expertise from the content you will base your decisions on.

It is critical you trust the right, and all the right, publications to trust any intelligence coming out of those publications. Depth and width.

No Trust, No Intelligence.

Importance for Advertising:
Brand Safety and Budget Optimization.

Here, you want to advertise your new product to the US Food Market. Keeping your brand safe will be your top priority… After all, you will pay to increase your business, not ruin the brand reputation it took you years to build.

Brand Safety is top priority for CEOs and CMOs.

For your online ad campaign, the trading desk of your advertising agency will define the query, with, amongst other things, desired and not-desired keywords, to select the content you trust compatible with your brand.

But a page can match all those criteria but be published on a site not safe or compatible with the advertiser’s brand. You must also select the publications you trust compatible with your brand.

Otherwise, your brand is at risk. And advertisers know and fear it:

4 in 10 brands deliver ads on unsafe sites – Cision

The only solution for the CMO to be certain to keep brands safe: Define himself the lists of publications he trusts compatible with her/his brands.

Consequence:

70% implement black or white lists… – Digiday

But while the vast majority is using lists, the vast majority is unhappy with the solution. As of today:

… but 64% fear negative impacts on performance.  71% fear to not achieve reach while delivering to the right audience in the right context. – Cision

Consequently, the solution is to:

1/ Have marketers define their white lists themselves for each campaign, each brand. And align in each country.

2/ Have those lists automatically built, maintained and updated, directly serving the trading desk.

Bottom line: Keep your Brand Safe, let TrustedOut manage your white lists.

Let’s go back to our US Food Market example. Our marketer, here, wants to build a white list of US based publications, specialized in Food and Beverage and also wants them to be in business for more than 3 years, not politically, nor religiously oriented and, of course, not spotted as fake news, hate news or junk science.

Corpus looks like above and now more than 9,000+ sources are immediately available to be imported or live feeding your trading desk.

Trading desk runs its query within the perimeter of the white list. Best of both worlds, search and directory.
Brand is now totally safe.

Run more where it returns more.

In addition, Media Profiles bring ad budget optimization.

By adding media profiles to a campaign report, marketers and agencies can surface media with the best ROI and thus, increase budgets where return is optimal.

BHG works best for your campaign? Let’s get more of this profile and spend your ad budget where it makes the most sense.

Update:

AdWeek just published this article “The Areas Where Brand Safety Measures Fall Short” and wrote

“Whitelisting, which only allows ads to be placed in approved environments, may in fact be the best brand safety insurance.”

Questions? Shoot!

 

Developed nations distrust Social Networks, Developing ones don’t.

This post is inspired from this The Guardian (UK Edition) article

More than four in five Britons distrust platforms such as Facebook and Twitter…

“…with other developed nations such as France, Germany and the US not far behind. The attitudes contrast sharply with those in middle-income countries such as Brazil, India and Mexico, where trust is far higher…. just 12% trusted information from social media, compared with 83% who had little or no trust in platforms such as Facebook and Twitter.

Less than 30% trust in Social Networks in developed nations, more than 50% in developing ones.

“In all, 23% of Americans said they trusted information gained from social media, as did 20% of Germans, and 28% of Canadians. In developing nations, however, the trust was much higher: a majority of Indians (52%), Saudis (52%) and Thais (52%) trusted information from social media – as did 51% of Poles.”

UK and US do trust Local news orgs.

“Just two sources of information were trusted by a majority of Britons: national TV news channels (61%) and local news organisations (54%). Only the US was more mistrusting of information sources in general. According to the polling, local news organisations are the sole news sources that are trusted by a majority of Americans (58%).”

Cambridge Analytica, Christchurch, US Elections… all had a toll on Social Networks.

“The Cambridge Analytica scandal highlighted big tech’s ability and willingness to harvest data and subvert democracy, while the Christchurch shooting is the latest example of terrorism encouraged by online radicalisation.

YouTube has continually been found showing inappropriate content to children, and all the social networks have been implicated in nation-state information warfare, beginning with Russian trolls uncovered on Twitter after the US election.”

The desire for regularization.

“Episodes such as these explain why Britain is leading calls for increased levels of regulation of social media and technology companies. More than 60% of Britons think those businesses should be regulated more than they are now, compared with just 6% who think there is too much regulation and 15% who think there is the right amount.”

Social Media vs Traditional Media

From a previous post:

Get information from Traditional Media, have conversation on Social Media. Not the other way around.

Must gauge who’s talking.

We are basing this post on theguardian.com UK Edition. Prior to write anything, we, of course, use TrustedOut to understand who they are.

They are no spotted as any toxic content, such as fake news, fake sciences, conspiracist… But are they knowledgeable about publishing? Let’s ask for TrustedOut Taxonomy:

TheGuardian.com UK Edition classified by TrustedOut AI-Operated Taxonomy.

We decided they were legit and wrote this post.

Questions? Shoot!

 

 

In Europe, for the 1st time, written press is more trusted than distrusted.

Credits: EBU

This post is our takeaways from an advanced-television.com article and an EBU (European Broadcasting Union) report.

In Europe, Social media and the Internet are much more distrusted than trusted. It’s the reverse for Radio and TV.

Radio is the most trusted medium by EU citizens – trusted by 59% of the population with half of all EU citizens trusting TV.

Only 32% trust the Internet. 19% trust social networks.

On the other hand, the internet is trusted by only 32% of citizens and social media by 19% (down from 36% and 21% respectively in 2014).

Correlation between national news trustworthiness and democracy.

A positive correlation between the perceived trustworthiness of national news and citizens’ satisfaction with democracy means radio and television are indispensable assets for European society.

Related posts:

The decline of local newspapers impact on democracy.

Trust, Media and Democracy

Must gauge who’s talking.

We are basing this post on advanced-television.com. Prior to write anything, we, of course, use TrustedOut to understand who they are.

They are no spotted as any toxic content, such as fake news, fake sciences, conspiracist… But are they knowledgeable about publishing? Let’s ask for TrustedOut Taxonomy:

Advanced-television classified by TrustedOut AI-Operated Taxonomy.

We decided they were legit and wrote this post.

Questions? Shoot!

 

Mind the gender trust gap.

Credits: Gender and trust report – Edelman 2019

We strongly encourage you to read the 2019 report on Gender and Trust from Edelman. Here are our takeaways.

Women trust less than men. In business, but in Media too.

As the chart above shows, in each and every categories, Women trust less than man. Open the report to find data for specific countries. As we have a lot of readers from France, a tease is to say Women less than men in France as well, but the gap is less than the US.

+22% in news engagement amongst women.

Edelman says “Opportunity also abounds for companies seeking to engage women with their news. This year revealed a 22-point jump in news engagement among women. This is a profound shift”

More than a third amplifies media.

“We now consider more than one-in-three women as amplifiers of the media (those who share and consume news weekly and share and post content at least once per month)—a lift of 15 points. This means they aren’t just consuming the news, but are actively adding to the conversation in ever-greater numbers. Women are sharing stories, debating topics and spotlighting issues that matter to them.”

Women in control of $40T (yes, $40,000,000,000,000)

“Building brands women trust — and want to buy from, work for and engage with — is hard work, but the upside for business is real. Last year, women are estimated to have controlled about $40 trillion in consumer spending across the world. And the most gender-diverse executive teams were more likely to have above-average profitability than the least diverse companies by 21 percent. We can’t afford to slow down now.”

Questions? Shoot!

 

Less than 15% of journalists trained to best report on misinformation.

This post comments an article from Poynter. New! we are sharing TrustedOut’s taxonomy on this source at the end of the post.

Only 14.9% of journalists surveyed said they had been trained on how to best report on misinformation.

In a new study conducted by the Institute for the Future, a California-based nonprofit think tank, researchers found more than 80% of journalists admitted to falling for false information online. The data was based on a survey of 1,018 journalists at regional and national publications in the United States.

Perhaps more concerning: Only 14.9% of journalists surveyed said they had been trained on how to best report on misinformation.”

High potential to be attacked by malicious actors on social media.

“For example, users on fringe platforms like 4chan regularly try to get the media to cover stories that amplify bogus or racist narratives.”

Daily stress in their daily life.

“There’s so much stuff on social media about current events and figuring out whether or not something is true or false … (it) is a serious challenge,” said Samuel Woolley, director of the Digital Intelligence Lab at the Institute for the Future, in a phone interview. “Journalists that we talked to were super open with the fact that this was a daily stress in their life.”

Must define trust.

TrustedOut is a database of Information Sources, entirely operated by AI, so analysts can define the profile of sources they trust and thus run intelligence tools on content they trust.

New demo page showcasing TrustedOut and BI, Ads and PR

Must gauge who’s talking.

We are basing this post on Poynter.com. Prior to write anything, we, of course, use TrustedOut to understand who they are.

They are no spotted as any toxic content, such as fake news, fake sciences, conspiracist… But are they knowledgeable about publishing? Let’s ask for TrustedOut Taxonomy:

Poynter classified by TrustedOut AI-Operated Taxonomy.

We decided they were legit and wrote this post.

Questions? Shoot!

Distrust is, both in Media and Gov, and both in Europe and the US.

Following our previous post “Populists/anti-elitists and Right wings share the same views on News Media in France” taken from Journalism.com (Pew Research) comes this chart showing

The level of distrust in news media follow the level of distrust in Governmental institutions.

To be noticed, UK, France and Italy trust their military and UK still has faith in its banking institution which is an interesting point in the midst of the Brexit. Don’t trust the media, trust banks?

A similar situation to the US.

A few weeks back, we posted this:

Distrust in Media driven by distrust in government.

As trust is personal, it must be personally defined.

This is the key message of TrustedOut:

While distrust is general, trust definition is personal.

Questions? Shoot!

 

 

Cyber-crime and Social Media: 62% afraid. 94% distrust. 66% ok to share.

[this post is based on an eWeek article on the Norton LifeLock Cyber Safety Insights Report – March 26th 2019]

62% believe risk for Cyber-crime is higher than the flu.

62 percent of Americans believe that experiencing cyber-crime is equally or more likely, than getting the flu. The study however also found that American want to be secure, however they are also willing in some circumstances to trade security for convenience.

94% have little or no trust in their social media provider’s ability to protect and manage personal information.

After a year of scandals and headlines, no surprised here. And we are not only talking about Facebook, but all social networks.
Consequence: 28% have deleted a social media account in the past 12 month as a result of a privacy concern.

84% want more about their privacy, but 66% are willing to share their personal data.

“According to the report, 84 percent of consumers want to do more improve their privacy, which was a surprising finding.” but “…many are willing to sell or give away their personal data including: internet search history, location and personal ID information such as a driver’s licenses. According to the report, 66 percent of consumers are willing to accept certain risks for data sharing to make life more convenient.”

But 72% do not want to pay for protection…

“72 percent of consumers saying they are not willing to pay social media providers to ensure their personal information is protected when using them, compared to 58 percent for retailers”

… as long as, for 77% they understand how their data are used and they can report abuse.

“77 percent of consumers said that it’s absolutely essential or very important to have the right to understand how their personal data is used. Additionally, 78 percent reported  that it’s absolutely essential or very important to have a way to report personal data misuse.”

Questions? Shoot!

Deck and demo from our 1st public event: TrustedOut+Digimind.

It was this Thursday morning and it was great. It was our first public presentation and it was great to partner with Digimind to show why TrustedOut can make Intelligence smarter and trustworthy. Merci Aurelien and Valentin.

The deck. TrustedOut.com/Digimind

Deck is in english. If you have question, let us know with the form below.

The demo. Step by step.

The scenario

ACME is a sport car maker launching a new model extensively using Artificial Intelligence (AI). ACME has 2 main countries, US and France and wonder what market to test first.

Step 1. Corpus Creation for country comparison.

New corpus, the CMO (or Marketing Manager) defines 3 conditions to be necessary.

a. Where are the publications? We said France and the United States
b. What should these publications be about? ACME wants to grab how AI is perceived from publications covering Politics, for regulations, Law, for any legal aspects, Tech, to gauge technology used and perceptions and, of course, Transportation, for anything car related.
c. Want to be safe from any toxic content? Of course, no fake new and no junk science

TrustedOut classification knows how gauge the expertise level of a source and how sensitive to the news the taxonomy should be.

At this stage, we want generalist publications by setting the expertise level to “Covered”

Here is the corresponding query for our Corpus, which we are going to name “ACME AI in new model”.

Once ready, “Save” will show us how many media and sources our Corpus will include…

… and the Taxonomy of your Corpus.

Let’s now connect your Corpus to Digimind to get Social Intelligence from your Corpus. Process is simple, click on “Get” and, instead of “Downloading” a csv or json file with all media and sources, which will not be up dated at all time, click on Connect and pick Digimind.

Your “ACME AI in new model” Corpus is now live and accessible for any projects related to this corpus definition. TrustedOut will continue to update it, all the time, with relevant media and sources.

Digimind collects content from those media sources, so no need to also connect “article abstracts” with Digimind.

Step 2. Comparing countries on AI.

As the Corpus is immediately available and up to date in Digimind, we can read the following top concepts in both countries about AI.

ACME is very sensitive to ethic in AI, so consequently pick France as the first country to test its new model to handle this ethic topic super carefully.

Step 3. Best media profiles for ad campaigns.

ACME’s CMO wants to check if Pure Player Media (media only available online) is a good target. After all, Pure Players should be more reactive and not having to sync print, for example, that can be daily, weekly or monthly, with immediate online publishing.

Let’s go back to TrustedOut and change the Corpus as follow:

a. Where are the publications? We now want to limit to France.
b. Select Pure Players? We want media where “out of digital” is set to None to only get those not publishing on any other support.

“Save”. And now we get these amounts

Step 4. The perfect mix ethic and Business for a 1st ad campaign.

While France is more “Ethic” on AI, Pure Players are more Business Oriented vs all. ACME CMO is seeing the growth from 37% (all media) to 45% (Pure Players) in business for this selection of media as the perfect vehicle to test an ethic message onto business oriented people.

Step 5. Talk to the talk in AI.

Now, ACME wants to launch its first Press Release and wants to address first the geek, very technical community.

Let’s go back to TrustedOut and make the following changes:

a. What should these publications be about? We now want only Tech and Transportation publications
b. How expert? Dedicated.

… and, of course, more specialized pubs means less as a total:

Step 6. Key concepts for an optimal PR campaign.

Digimind gives us the key concepts to write our Press Release: European Union/Commission and Neuronal Networks.

With the Corpus we have what publications to target, with those key concepts we have how to write a Press Release that will interest those targets.

Bottom line:
TrustedOut+Digimind = Market selection, Optimal ad budgets and Perfect PR.

Questions? Shoot!

 

Important does not mean interesting. Quite the opposite.

Inversely proportionated.

The more Important a news topic is for daily life, the less interesting it is to follow.

Weather, Crime and traffic are top important for daily life but definitely not topics to follow.

Gov and Politics #1 in not important for daily life and a third of interest to follow vs Restaurants, Clubs and Bars.

This is to be related to:

The decline of local newspapers impact on democracy.

and this, to save a declining situation:

“Local leads to trust”

taken seriously by Google, Facebook, Knight Foundation, Automatic…

Saving journalism. [updated 2/19/19]

Questions? Shoot!

 

 

 

Google to the local media rescue.

Google to the local media rescue.

As a follow up to our post originally posted 1/17, updated 2/19, here’s the march update, in a separate post as we’re covering here a Google initiative.

Saving journalism. [updated 2/19/19]

The Local Experiment Project.

[this post is inspired by an Axios post] “Google is launching the Local Experiments Project, an effort to fund dozens of new local news websites around the country and eventually around the world.

Financially supported. Editorially independent.

The tech giant says it will have no editorial control over the sites, which will be built by partners it selects with local news expertise.”

The Compass Experiment.

Is a partnership between Google and McClatchy to launch three new, digital-only local news operations on multiple platforms.

  • McClatchy will maintain sole editorial control and ownership of the sites and Google will have no input or involvement in any editorial efforts or decision making.
  • Google says the investments will be significant. “We will be spending many millions of dollars on this overall,” says Richard Gingras, Google’s VP of news.
  • McClatchy will choose 3 cities that are less than a half million people for the site launches. It hasn’t announced any hiring plans, but people familiar with the efforts say there will eventually be people on the ground in those cities.
  • Smaller cities will be the focus. McClatchy CEO Craig Forman says it’s targeting cities with less than a half million people because that’s where local news decay is worst. Gingras says those cities are important because people there have a strong sense of community, which can harder to tap into at the metro and national levels.

Between the lines: McClatchy will be the first of many “experiments” within the Local Experiment Project. The goal is to use the lessons from McClatchy’s efforts, and others in the future, to create a network of shared insights that can be leveraged by everyone in the local news business.

Next? The World!

What’s next: If successful, Google may expand its tools and services to enable others to launch similar sites in other places in the U.S. and around the world. Gingras points to examples of news sites in Canada, France and the U.S. as examples of local news businesses that can thrive with the right strategies and investments.

04.11.19.900.Paris

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Brands buy Media Brands.

Reaching out to customers. Potential and existing.

There was advertising.
There was sponsoring.
There also was Commercial Brands creating their own media brand, such as (sources: Axios):

Now, Brands buy Media Brands

Robinhood, a trading app (raised $110M in 2017), instead of creating its own brand like seen above, is buying one: MarketSnacks , a newsletter and podcast media brand focused on financial trading. An interesting evolution for the media industry. Imagine, Nissan buying Car and Driver? Yes, I hear you. Jeff Bezos owns the Washington Post, but it’s not Amazon and WaPo is not a straight coverage for Amazon either.

All about transparency.

As written, trust in Media will come back with Privacy and Transparency. As long as you are aware of who is behind a Media, (or political orientation, or depth of expertise…) the content will be educational and useful as long as you accept the profile of the media.

Top 2019 predictions: Privacy and Transparency

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Facebook’s news tab is a great idea IF users can curate their sources.

Screenshot from Facebook

The new News tab idea…

If you have an hour, this video/conversation is definitely worth it. Matthias Döpfner, Axel Springer’s CEO, was blunt and asked the right questions, from a journalist, online and print publisher, EU guy.

… if the user can define her/his trust criteria.

My fav part is well explained in this Recode article and in particular, the News tab idea is great but, to me and unsurprisingly, only if the FB user can do its own curation of publishers meeting his/her trust values.

“And as Zuckerberg notes in his comments, he isn’t sure whether Facebook should be curating a mix of news for users or letting them pick most of what they want to see.

Trust is personal. No-one can tell you what you trust.

As we wrote:

While distrust is general, trust definition is personal.

This is the foundation of TrustedOut.

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Online lie detector or Machine learning how to lie.

Online lie detector or Machine learning how to lie.

Interesting article in Wired “RESEARCHERS BUILT AN ‘ONLINE LIE DETECTOR.’ HONESTLY, THAT COULD BE A PROBLEM”

Yes, it’s a first attempt. Yes, it should be taken very cautiously.
But yes, it has merit.

Typing and writing.

The way you type and the words you use show a level of lie or truth, from your standpoint. While recording and analyzing the typing part sounds more like a lie detection test, the word used are, in fact, much more accurate.

TrustedOut uses a similar method.

As mentioned, TrustedOut uses extensively machine learning. In this previous post, we explained how machine learning is the basis of our classification. For taxonomy or how to spot how a media is perceived on the internet.

The How and What: Mixing attitude and expertise.

Now, imagine you mix an attitude, such as lying or being blunt, or positive, or sarcastic and a taxonomy classification, and you mix two or more classifications based on machine learning. And you get the how and what…

04.11.19.900.Paris

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Distrust in Media driven by distrust in government.

According to VisionCritical: “trust [in Media] among the informed public in the U.S. plunged 23 points to 45, making it the lowest of the 28 countries surveyed. The collapse of trust is driven by a staggering lack of faith in government. This fell 14 points to 33 percent among the general population, and 30 points to 33 percent among the informed public. [Numbers are for the USA]”

63% can’t recognize journalism from rumors.

“The 2018 Trust Barometer found 63 percent of respondents don’t know how to tell good journalism from rumor, or whether a respected media organization had produced a piece of news. But the public doesn’t rely solely on news media organizations to stay informed. We also use search engines and social media. The irony is that these platforms—once hailed as the future of media—are hurting too. The rising distrust of traditional media comes at a time when social media giants such as Facebook are facing intense scrutiny about their role in spreading disinformation. The Huffington Post recently announced it would no longer rely on unpaid bloggers.

Journalism for the win!

It’s all about brand values.

We recently published in “Why customer trust is more vital to [media] brand survival than it’s ever been” :

Gaining trust: demonstrate [media] brand clarity of purpose and core values and be transparent with all policies and procedures.

“Board and staff members need to adhere to these ethical standards as, in effect, they are the brand and only they can elicit consumer trust,” he [Director of brand agency Hulsbosch, Jaid Hulsbosch] says.

To do this, a corporation and its brand needs to be determined to demonstrate brand clarity of purpose and core values and be transparent with all policies and procedures”

Profiling Media Brands to secure trust in analytics and brand safety.

Brand values for any business, including Media, are the foundation of trust for customers, readers. Understanding them is the solution to secure trust in analytics support for strategic decision making and totally secure advertiser’s brand within a campaign.

Questions? Shoot!

 

TrustedOut + Digimind = Trust in your Sources means Trust in your Analytics.

Register to the event

Mark your agenda! 04.11.19.900.

April 11th, 9-11:30am. Paris, Champs Elysees. Register here!

Trust in the content you analyze, Trust in your analytics.

We will demo TrustedOut Corpus Intelligence to provide tailor-made content, precisely defined by the analyst and how it impacts analytics to make secure, solid and trustworthy decisions.

Discover why we say “TrustedOut Corpus Intelligence makes Intelligence smarter and trustworthy.”

Register asap to secure a seat!

Time for journalists to acknowledge that they write from a set of values, not simply from a disinterested effort at truth?

As Columbia Journalism Review puts it, “one gets the sense that the pitch of anti-press sentiment is now the most fevered it’s been since the founding of the republic. In fact, presidents from George Washington on, including Thomas Jefferson… judged newspapers to be full of lies. “. Sounds familiar?

Credits: cjr.org

Readers responsibility to discern for themselves the difference between what can be trusted as factual and reporter’s judgment. 

“… the old days of ritually objective news reporting (he said/she said) are not gone but have been reduced in importance from the 1970s on, as mainstream outlets have increasingly emphasized analysis in news coverage—not quite so much “who, what, when, where” as “why.” There has been a profound cultural shift in journalism during this period. The limitations of straitjacketed objectivity came to be understood and journalism began to embrace the necessity of interpretation… In the face of the severe economic problems afflicting daily newspapers, leading metro dailies have continued, whenever possible, to pursue aggressive, analytical journalism. This places great responsibility on readers to discern for themselves the difference between what can be trusted as factual and what represents the reporter’s judgment—a judgment that, however conscientious, goes beyond documented facts.”

“It may also be time for journalists to acknowledge that they write from a set of values, not simply from a disinterested effort at truth.”

“This will not be easy, since journalists have spent decades denying that their personal values have anything to do with their news reporting.”

Trust is personal. Personal is Trust.

“Tom Rosenstiel, the executive director of the American Press Institute, told her that for many people, “there’s ‘the media’ (bad) and there’s ‘my media’ (fairly good).” Likewise, he noted, people have little faith in Congress but think their own local representatives are okay.

Sounds familiar? Yep. We wrote about this…

developed in this post: While distrust is general, trust definition is personal.

Bottom line: Media should strengthen their brand values with the upmost  transparency to increase Reader’s trust.

Questions? Shoot!

TrustedOut AI-Operated Classification

Data Collection and Content Classification.

Our database of Media profiles has 2 distinct jobs. Collecting intangible data, like revenue, ownership, years online…) and Classifying content for our taxonomy and how sites are “spotted as” (like “fake news”, “junk science”…)

Data Collection is a multi-references, cross checking and evolution watch crawling exercise when…

Content Classification is all about Machine Learning.

And all about “bags of words”. For every classification job, we build datasets made of words onto which the frequency of occurence is used to train a classifier.

As mentioned above, we have 2 types of Classification: Taxonomy and “spotted as”.

Taxonomy Classification.

As in the graphic above, every articles is matched against our taxonomy datasets so we can classify each and every article. This gives us a clear picture of a feed, and thus, the whole media.

This, of course, makes a (big) lot of operations: 75,000 per article. Yes, 75 Billions ops per million of articles daily.

Taxonomy fun facts (as of today!)

Taxonomy DNA

Hereafter is the visualization of the New York Times, Tech section’s DNA.

Sensitiveness and depth customization. Tailor-made for the analyst.

Datasets used to classify articles can use a customized buffer of time for those datasets and thus, manage how sensitive to daily news the taxonomy will be. In addition, cliffs can also be customized to select a depth of expertise, from “dedicated” to “covered” or even “all sounds”. Both combined, plus the “always up-to-date” factor, makes our taxonomy perfectly tailor-made for the job the analyst wants to run. Reason why we use “Corpus Intelligence” as our tagline.

Enterprise mapping.

We can also link our taxonomy to our Enterprise Client’s taxonomy, so Corpus Intelligence can use the client’s business environment, (We’ll cover this in a dedicated post later. If you can’t wait, ask using the form below)

“Spotted as” Classification.

Point of being AI-Operated is we do not have any emotion or opinion. Everything is made for our client to define what they truly need and trust for content.

TrustedOut does not score nor judge anything or anyone. In addition, notions like “fake news” is not as cristal clear as people may think. The “Media, Trust and Democracy report” says it perfectly in its introduction: “Concern about “fake news” is high, but we can’t agree on what that means.”

A vivid picture on how a Media is “spotted as”.

As, TrustedOut profiles Media and their brand values, we have developed a sophisticated way to classify how a Media is “spotted”. In other words, we do not score or judge, we tell you if a Media is “spotted as” a fake news publication, for example.

In addition, the way a Media is “spotted as” varies over time. Some are getting worse, some are just revivals of previously shutdown ones, some are, of course, fixed and improved. This is why it’s mandatory to keep an always updated classification. And consequently, have your Corpus of documents always up-to-date.

Works with any terms. Bad or good.

“Fake news” is always the first coming to mind, then all toxic or suspicious terms like “Extreme bias”, “Junk Science”… but it can also works perfectly for neutral or positive terms, like “Visionary”, “Optimistic”… This opens doors to Enterprise-wide personalization.

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In California, “Cannabis industry more trusted than Social Media”.

Our takeaways from this recommended Wired article:

“58 percent of Californians think the tech industry should be “more regulated,” up from 46 percent in 2018. An even larger group, 68 percent think the tech industry has been “under-regulated” rather than “over-regulated,” up from 62 percent in 2018 and about 59 percent in 2017.”

Level of trust in marijuana dispensaries and growers—44% and 43%. Trust in social media—33%.

Credits: Edelman

Failure to protect data and lack of privacy.

“Among employees, privacy and security were the top worries. Of 11 possible concerns about the tech industry—from increasing housing costs and income inequality to a possible tech bubble collapse—57 percent of workers said their primary concern was “failure to protect from data security threats,” tied with “lack of privacy/my data is shared too much.””

Gonna be ok.

“For “tech” as a whole, 61 percent of respondents said they had a high level of trust that the industry would do what’s right. For “startup companies” and “the sharing economy,” the figures were similar to the pot industry—47 percent of respondents said they trusted companies in those sectors to do the right thing.”

High expectations for an outsize impact.

“Sixty-seven percent of respondents said tech leaders should be doing more to improve California. Given the industry’s outsize impact, 81 percent said tech should do more to improve local issues, up from 75 percent in 2018 and 76 percent said tech leaders are obligated to do more on societal issues, up from 71 percent last year.”

Get information from traditional Media, Conversation on Social Media…

As we wrote:

Get information from Traditional Media, have conversation on Social Media. Not the other way around.

Questions? Shoot!

 

Keywords (Data) Voids: Misinformations via Google and Bing.

Credit: pexels.com

In decreasing order of Trust in News: Media I use, Media Overall, Search engines and Social Media.

From the must-read Reuters Institute and Oxford University Digital News Report, you can read the following for the US:

Misinformation using keyword voids via Google and Bing. The “evil unicorn problem”.

Keywords Voids, also known as Data Voids, might not be the only reason for this low level of Trust but it’s important to know how this works.

Desperately seeking quality content.

Every one of us searches Google 3-4 times every day.

But every searches are not equal. Lots of searches are too vague and thus will return lots of noise and (yes!) 15% of all searches on a yearly basis were never searched before.

Bottom line, in the too vague a query, you will add more words and the combinaison may not have much quality content. Same for searches never searched before.

This means there are many search terms for which the available relevant data is limited, non-existent, or deeply problematic. We call these “data voids” or “keywords voids”

The malicious exploit: Wide open door to misinformation and manipulation.

Typology of Keywords/Data Voids (source (highly recommended read): Data Voids: Where Missing Data Can Easily Be Exploited)

Active Keywords/Data Voids on breaking news.

“Data voids that are actively weaponized by adversarial actors immediately following a breaking news event, usually involving names of locations or suspects in violent attacks (e.g., “Sutherland Springs” or “Parkland.”)”

Active Keywords/Data Voids on problematic terms.

“Data voids that are actively weaponized by adversarial actors around problematic search terms, usually with racial, gendered, or other discriminatory intent (e.g., “black on white crime” or “The Greatest Story Never Told” or “white genocide statistics.”)”

Passive Keywords/Data Voids on a particular group

“Data voids that passively reflect bias or prejudice in society but are not ac- tively being weaponized or exploited by a particular group (e.g., “CEO.”)”

A byproduct of cultural prejudice.

Not an easy task. “Data voids are a byproduct of cultural prejudice and a site of significant manipulation by individuals and organizations with nefarious intentions. Addressing data voids cannot be achieved by removing problematic content, not only because removal might go against the goals of search engines but also because doing so would not be effective. Without high-quality content to re- place removed content, new malicious content can easily surface”

Responding to data voids requires making certain that high-quality content…

“Unlike other forms of content moderation, responding to data voids requires making certain that high-quality content is available in spaces where people may seek to exploit or manipulate users into engaging with malignant information.”

… but only you can decide what is a “quality content”.

This is why we are building TrustedOut. Am AI-Operated database of media profiles. Unbiased. Up-to-date. Universal.

Questions? Shoot!

 

“Local leads to trust”

“The shorter the distance between our neighbors and our news, the stronger our community.”

This article from NiemanLab about an event organized by the Knight Foundation is a perfect follow up to our previous post:

The decline of local newspapers impact on democracy.

Saving the Soldat Local News

… and, as a reminder the Knight Foundation did commit an addition $300M to support journalism and local news

Saving journalism. [updated 2/19/19]

The American Journalism Project

Things are definitely moving with the launch of the American Journalism Project, a venture philanthropy effort co-led by Chalkbeat founder Elizabeth Green and Texas Tribune founder John Thornton, with $42 million in its first fund.

Attention, money, efforts… we’ll keep you updated on this. Stay tuned.

Questions? Shoot!

 

 

“Why customer trust is more vital to [media] brand survival than it’s ever been”

We recently wrote in the post below:

“Your Trust is based on the publisher brands you value.”

TrustedOut’s market

Because Trust and brands are so linked, including for Media, we wanted to share our takeaways from this CMO (Chief Marketing Officer) article “Why customer trust is more vital to brand survival than it’s ever been” [article applies beyond Australia].

Authenticity is key to trust, so how do [media] brands build this in a world of digital and social upheaval?

“Simply saying a brand is going to do something, without backing it up with actions, is a consumer disaster waiting to happen.”

“It’s about being transparent, doing what is expected and shared values. Key to this is the internal culture of the brand becoming more evident,” she [Qualtrics customer experience subject matter expert and principal consultant, Vicky Katsabaris] says. “The expectation is you deliver to those values with more purpose-driven activities so you are living and breathing the values.

Gaining trust: demonstrate [media] brand clarity of purpose and core values and be transparent with all policies and procedures.

“Board and staff members need to adhere to these ethical standards as, in effect, they are the brand and only they can elicit consumer trust,” he [Director of brand agency Hulsbosch, Jaid Hulsbosch] says.

To do this, a corporation and its brand needs to be determined to demonstrate brand clarity of purpose and core values and be transparent with all policies and procedures”

2019 predictions.

This confirms our predictions for 2019…

Top 2019 predictions: Privacy and Transparency

…  and confirms the uptrend in trust in media lately.

 

 

 

The decline of local newspapers impact on democracy.

 

A recent study published in Oxford’s Journal of Communication (and available here) shows some very interesting links between the impact of losing a local newspaper and the increase of bipartisan (left or right) votes. Here are our takeaways:

Newspaper Closures Polarize Voting Behavior

Missing local news has a negative impact on political outcomes

“Local news sources are not merely suffering in this new marketplace—many are disappearing for good (Hindman, 2009; Shaker, 2014). As newspapers close, other local media are not emerging to fill the information gaps, with negative impacts on important political outcomes”

Less local news, less regard on local politics.

“Another emerging literature details negative consequences of declining local news. Where local newspapers are weaker, people know less about their representatives and subnational governments and turn out at lower rates (Hayes and Lawless, 2015, 2018; Kübler & Goodman, 2018; Shaker, 2014), and municipal governments spend less and borrow at higher rates (Gao et al., 2018; Yazaki, 2017). ”

The Nationalizing Media Environment and Political Polarization

Less news opinions creates more, national-based, bipartisan decisions

“Declining access to quality local news is harmful to voter behavior and responsive governance, leading to more corruption (Arnold, 2004; Besley, Burgess, & Prat, 2002; Campante & Do, 2014; Strömberg, 2004) and lower voter turnout (Schulhofer-Wohl & Garrido, 2013). In the absence of quality local news options, Americans may rely on partisanship and national news to inform their political decisions (Hopkins, 2018; Trussler, 2018).” A relative reduction of local news in the media marketplace may result in less exposure to local news and more regular exposure to national media, with significant effects on engagement and partisan voting (Clinton & Enamorado, 2014; Hopkins & Ladd, 2014; Hopkins, 2018).

When a local newspaper closes, split-ticket voting decreases by 1.9%.

[Split-ticket voting refers to when a voter in an election votes for candidates from different political parties when multiple offices are being decided by a single election, as opposed to straight-ticket voting, where a voter chooses candidates from the same political party for every office up for election. – Wikipedia]

Less local news mix local and national matters.

“Our findings connect the literature on the polarizing effects of the changing news environment to scholarship on the negative democratic consequences of the decline of local news: just as adding the internet or partisan cable news to the media environment can influence voting behavior, removing a local news source from the marketplace may polarize the choices citizens make”

So, now, what?

We wrote on Jan 17th, the post below announcing Google, Facebook, and now the Knight Foundation have reach a whooping $1B financial support quality journalism and for local news…

Saving journalism. [updated 2/19/19]

Also, on Feb 11th, we published this:

Trust, Media and Democracy

Why it matters to us

Quality journalism is mandatory for democracy and vital to Media brand values. The foundation of TrustedOut Media profiling  to provide sources Analysts will define as their need and trust in Business Intelligence, Advertising and PR.

Questions? Shoot!

Get information from Traditional Media, have conversation on Social Media. Not the other way around.

Misinformation and biases infect social media, both intentionally and accidentally

This highly recommended article from The Conversation exposes 3 types of bias identified by Indiana University. Hereafter are our takeaways.

1/ Bias in the brain

More information means less quality content shared

“Cognitive biases originate in the way the brain processes the information that every person encounters every day. The brain can deal with only a finite amount of information, and too many incoming stimuli can cause information overload. That in itself has serious implications for the quality of information on social media. We have found that steep competition for users’ limited attention means that some ideas go viral despite their low qualityeven when people prefer to share high-quality content.”

Beware emotions in headline trap

“One cognitive shortcut happens when a person is deciding whether to share a story that appears on their social media feed. People are very affected by the emotional connotations of a headline, even though that’s not a good indicator of an article’s accuracy.”

What matters is where it’s coming from.

“Much more important is who wrote the piece.”

TrustedOut foundation: profile who’s behind to evaluate your trustworthiness appreciation and the path to greater trust in media:

Optimism and method for greater trust in media.

2/ Bias in society

Like seeks like (“Birds of a feather flock together”)

“When people connect directly with their peers, the social biases that guide their selection of friends come to influence the information they see. …social networks are particularly efficient at disseminating information – accurate or not – when they are closely tied together and disconnected from other parts of society.”

“Us vs Them”

“The tendency to evaluate information more favorably if it comes from within their own social circles creates echo chambers that are ripe for manipulation, either consciously or unintentionally. This helps explain why so many online conversations devolve into “us versus them” confrontations.”

We are right. Distrust in fact-checking

“…during the 2016 U.S. presidential elections [analysis] shows that Twitter accounts that shared misinformation were almost completely cut off from the corrections made by the fact-checkers. When we drilled down on the misinformation-spreading accounts, we found a very dense core group of accounts retweeting each other almost exclusively – including several bots. The only times that fact-checking organizations were ever quoted or mentioned by the users in the misinformed group were when questioning their legitimacy or claiming the opposite of what they wrote.

3/ Bias in the machine

Getting more of the same. Accurate. Or not.

“The third group of biases arises directly from the algorithms used to determine what people see online. Both social media platforms and search engines employ them. These personalization technologies are designed to select only the most engaging and relevant content for each individual user. But in doing so, it may end up reinforcing the cognitive and social biases of users, thus making them even more vulnerable to manipulation.”

Illusory truth effect. Repeat until it feels true.

“For instance, the detailed advertising tools built into many social media platforms let disinformation campaigners exploit confirmation bias by tailoring messages to people who are already inclined to believe them. Also, if a user often clicks on Facebook links from a particular news source, Facebook will tend to show that person more of that site’s content. This so-called “filter bubble” effect may isolate people from diverse perspectives, strengthening confirmation bias.”

Popularity bias. More clicks makes it feel more true.

“Another important ingredient of social media is information that is trending on the platform, according to what is getting the most clicks. We call this popularity bias, because we have found that an algorithm designed to promote popular content may negatively affect the overall quality of information on the platform. This also feeds into existing cognitive bias, reinforcing what appears to be popular irrespective of its quality.”

Get information from Traditional Media, have conversation on Social Media. Not the other way around.

Unsurprisingly, and somewhat reassuring, numbers from Reuters/Oxford (hereafter for the US) show trust in social media are the lowest with 13% vs 34% for news overall and the highest at 50% with News/Media I use. (we developed this with this post “While distrust is general, trust definition is personal.“)

Related posts:

Saving journalism. [updated 2/19/19]

Top 2019 predictions: Privacy and Transparency

TrustedOut’s market

Questions? Comments? Contact us!

 

 

Older people share more fake news.

Age predicts behavior better than any other characteristics (even party affiliation )

Researchers at New York and Princeton Universities, through their recent surveys, are saying older users shared more fake news than younger ones regardless of education, sex, race, income, or how many links they shared. [source: The Verge]

7 times more fake news sharing

“But older users skewed the findings: 11 percent of users older than 65 shared a hoax, while just 3 percent of users 18 to 29 did. Facebook users ages 65 and older shared more than twice as many fake news articles than the next-oldest age group of 45 to 65, and nearly seven times as many fake news articles as the youngest age group (18 to 29).”

Profiling media sources…

“It won’t be easy: how to determine whether a person is digitally literate remains an open question. But at least some of the issue is likely to come down to design: fake news spreads quickly on Facebook in part because news articles generally look identical in the News Feed, whether they are posted by The New York Times or a clickbait farm.”

… to build trust.

Profiling sources so limit fake news spreading is similar, in logic, to profiling sources to limit misleading intelligence. We call it “Corpus Intelligence” and will focus on B2B solutions. In production end Q1 2019.

Trust, Media and Democracy

click here to read report

The Aspen Institute and the Knight Foundation recently released a report on a commission they organized about Trust, Media and Democracy. While coming from America, we believe most can apply wider.

If you don’t have the time for the length report, this medium page is very interesting. Here are our takeaways in the light of our previous posts, regrouped in 3 main categories:

10 ways to rebuild trust in media and democracy

Before starting up, we can not resist to simply cut and paste the introduction paragraph: “Our nation is experiencing a crisis of trust. We believe that reliable news is vital to our democracy, but many of us can’t name an objective news source. Concern about “fake news” is high, but we can’t agree on what that means. We can’t even assume every American is operating under the same set of facts. We retreat to polarized political tribes and don’t want to listen to anyone outside them.” – Superbly written and so much in alignment with what we believe and the motivation to create TrustedOut.

Of course, the purpose here is not a posture of “we know better” but rather than copycatting what the article says, simply note we wrote about most of those points and thus, are in agreement with them.

a/ Privacy and Transparency (#1, 5 & 6)

Top 2019 predictions: Privacy and Transparency

b/ Financial support (#2, 3, 4 & 7)

Saving journalism.

c/ Education (#8, 9 & 10)

Media trust over education stages

Feedback welcome. Go the bottom of any TrustedOut.com page…

TrustedOut’s market

In its latest report on Social Intelligence, Forrester writes, straight right from the beginning:

Enterprises Are Still Not Using Social Intelligence To Its Full Potential” 

“Social Listening Platforms’ Current Offerings All Look Alike

Each social listening platform provider emphasizes its unique applicability and use across the enterprise. But each vendor also parades a roster of features and functionalities that largely look the same from one to the next. Buyers will struggle to distinguish major differences between each vendor’s current offering because social listening platforms all rely on the same data sources as the foundation of their platforms. … most vendors in this evaluation tap into the same third-party aggregators such as webhose.io for web content, LexisNexis or Factiva for news, … Social listening platform shoppers may find the breadth of data sources an important selection factor, but the discernment of data differentiation becomes increasingly difficult when all vendors source from the same well. ”  – Forrester, Q3’18

We couldn’t agree more.

Even more if you add the current crisis of distrust in content. Magnified but far, far more complex than just some fact checking to feel better with fake news being fixed. No, fake news are just the tip of the iceberg. The issue of trust in news and information in general is to, first understand who is talking before listening to anything they say, and then, ultimately taking any action.

The immense problem today is to not profile who is talking and thus, the trust you can put in the publisher, before spreading and commenting which means adding your intrinsic support.

Intelligence needs data.

Nothing new here. AI with its deep and machine learning, needs data. Analysts need data… any kind of intelligence needs data.

Social Intelligence needs data.

Forrester makes a point by saying there is no differentiation of the offer because there is no differentiation of the data used for the Social Intelligence. Of course, we agree and that’s the foundation of TrustedOut: providing profiled media sources. Let’s have a look at the 3 references mentioned by Forrester:

Webhose.io, Factiva and LexisNexis are all about articles. We believe Media is what matters.

Webhose.io claims to be “Data As A Service”, provides articles. Factiva (Dow Jones) does the same but claims to be curated by (lots of) humans. LexisNexis does the same but focused on legal.

We totally respect those three and in no way, are we judging them. We are just saying they, all three, take an “article” approach. You could also get your articles by the author name but none is scoring them.

None of them is focusing on the media itself. TrustedOut does. Here is why:

Trust is based on a reputation. An article does not have a reputation.

An author may have a reputation but is temporary and linked to a matter.

A publisher brand definitely has a reputation and its values guarantee stability.

Bottom line: Your Trust is based on the publisher brands you value.

This is why TrustedOut is an AI-Operated profiling media database offering our clients to define their trust via sophisticated queries (65+ fields and 400+ categories) because ONLY you can define your own trust. No-one can tell you what you trust.

The distrust fix is in giving you the tools to define what you trust.

Update: Digital Content Next wrote recentlyConsumer trust is a vital and a key differentiator for publishers in a competitive environment. Fostering trust, prioritizing consumer rights and offering transparency of data practices is more important than ever before for premium publishers.”. This could be from us.

Company sizes.

LexisNexis has 10,000+ employees and $2.8 Billions in revenue, 5M users and is available in 175 countries.

Factiva was bought by Dow Jones in 2006 for $160 Millions when their revenue was $290 Millions, used by 1.8M users and 80% of the Fortune Global 500.

Webhose.io is a younger independent company out of Tel Aviv claiming 35,000 registered users, $5.5M in revenue and 115 languages.

Market is growing fast.

$4B in 2018 and according to BusinessWire: “The Global Social Media Analytics Market size is expected to reach $11.6 billion by 2023, rising at a market growth of 28.6% CAGR during the forecast period.”

Various Sector Demands is growing fast.

“Asset managers double spending on new data in hunt for edge” – Financial Times

“Investment groups have more than doubled their spending on new digital information sets and data scientists in the past two years… Asset managers last year spent a total of $373m on data sets and hiring new employees to parse them, up 60 per cent on 2016, and will probably spend a total of $616m this year, according to a survey of investors by AlternativeData.org, a trade body for the industry. It forecasts that overall expenditures will climb to over $1bn by 2020″

So, demand is fast growing…. better use content you trust.

Taxonomy fun facts (as of today!)

Taxonomy DNA for The New York Times – Tech section

In these 2 recent posts, we announced our AI-operated Taxonomy…

Introducing Taxonomy DNA

Taxonomy DNA (cont.) – comparing a specialist vs a generalist

… time now to share some fun facts about it:

10,000,000 words

is the dictionary of words used for the qualification of our taxonomy classifications. Those words were precisely selected to be meaningful for each of our taxonomy classifications (leaves).

100,000 new article abstracts collected daily.

Every day, 100k article abstracts are collected. This number should grow to 1 million a day within 3 months.

75,000 operations per article

… to classify within our taxonomy every single article for every single day for every single feed for every single media.

8 Billions classification operations daily

This is growing daily and should reach 50 to 70B shortly.

Allowing for sophisticated Taxonomy classifications filters.

Thereafter is an example of how to filter classifications and depth of specialization per classification (we’ll dig into this more in a coming post) for your corpus:

Corpus creation and maintenance (may change)

Of course, should you have questions, let us know!

The incredible story of a 10 year long fake, success story.

For 10 years. Fake pharmaceutical, fake CEO, real top-notch business school.

It’s the real story of the fake story of Berden and its CEO. Both are the result of a top notch curriculum at HEC in France. [HBR story here]. The course is to control Enterprise reputation and the challenge was to create a Co., Berden, and its CEO, Eric Dumontpierre. And the success was incredible. For 10 years, the CEO was beloved, the company was super visible, to the point a real competitor sent a cease and decease for a… fake product of fake Berden.

The trick: Do not talk to medias

“The students had only one constraint to respect: not to communicate directly with the media. They had to build their reputation organically, by building an online ecosystem of websites and social network accounts where they would publish press releases and other information about the company, its history and activities.”

The method: Spread false…

Recent studies show that false information is easier to peddle than true information

… bold…

Research on the dissemination of “fake news” shows that students have used communication techniques identified decades ago by researchers as drivers of this phenomenon. Readers are more likely to circulate strong stories that evoke emotions such as fear (river pollution), disgust (child labour) and surprise or joy (32-hour work week) than smooth stories.

… repeat, until it sounds true.

Researchers have shown that repetition increases perceived veracity. In other words, familiarity induces credibility.

The fix: Trust profiled medias.

As previously written here, the solution to avoid this chaos is for medias to have clear values delivered and defended by professional journalists. THE weak point, the trick used here is the absence of contact with medias.

Absence of media opens the door to total chaos in education, opinions and decision-making. TrustedOut Corpus Intelligence is here to profile a totally unbiased, AI-Operated, Media database so Intelligence tools are fed with the content business analysts trust.

 

Social vs Traditional Media Analytics.

Do they compare? Are they opposed? Is one already over? 

Yes, Social Media have changed and are changing Business Intelligence. But, while Social Media are definitely newer than traditional media, does it mean, one should be considered and not the other?

How do Social Media and Traditional Media compare?

According to Wikipedia: Social media outlets operate in a dialogic transmission system (many sources to many receivers). This is in contrast to traditional media which operates under a monologic transmission model (one source to many receivers)”

We agree.

Monitoring and Listening apply to both Social and Traditional Media.

“Social monitoring is identifying and responding to individual brand mentions on social media. Social listening, on the other hand, is collecting data from those social mentions and broader customer conversations, and pulling insights from them so you can make better decisions for your customers… Social monitoring is reactive. … where social listening, which is proactive,… allows brands to take those short-term interactions and build them to glean insights for a long-term strategy. … Through social listening, you can also unearth trends among your industry, competitors, and consumer experiences. You can then make necessary changes to stay ahead of the curve and keep customers happy.”- Sprinklr

We agree. For both. Monitoring and Listening apply to Social and Traditional Media. Monitoring is the PR/Alert and Listening is the Intelligence/Analytics part. Matter of fact, the Sprinklr post goes on with metaphors:

“There are many metaphors you can use to make this distinction clearer. Social monitoring is the trees; social listening is the forest. Social monitoring is the pixels; social listening is the picture. Social monitoring is the bandaid; social listening helps you find the cure.”

We agree again. All apply to both Social and Traditional Media.

Social and Traditional Analytics are both mandatory.

From the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA): “Therefore, thinking about both (social and traditional) as steps within finding, converting and keeping customers seems like a mentality shift we all need to make. This has already proven true… the smartest tactics from advertising, public relations, marketing and editorial together, regardless of the type of media. In essence, [clients] are merging social and traditional rather than thinking of them separately.”The Digital Research and Analytics group, a subset of Ketchum 

The mandatory need to profile what you are listening to.

The very same way you want to understand who is talking in Social Media Listening, you must profile the Traditional Media you are analyzing to understand who is talking in Traditional Media Listening.

Intelligence In makes Intelligence Out.

Not knowing the profile of the media you are using for your analytics means not knowing what comes out of your analytics tools.

In other words, not profiling what you feed your tools with, means you are totally wasting your time and money.

All intelligence processes are made or broken by the quality of what they are fed with.

Would you trust, and make decisions based on a survey where you don’t trust the sample used for that survey? (Here’s the wikipedia page on Survey methodology explaining sampling) and thus…

Corpus Intelligence makes Intelligence trustworthy.

TrustedOut Full Overview | Business cases: Content orientations | Media metrics impact | Country comparisons

Update: Traditional news media are back

in the just released Edelman Trusted Barometer

  • The number of respondents who consume traditional news weekly or more, and share or post news content several times a month or more, has increased by 14 percentage points from 26% to 40%.
  • Those who consume traditional news weekly or more has risen by 8 percentage points from 24% to 32%.
  • Inversely, the number of people who say they consume traditional news less than weekly has dropped by over 20 percentage points from 49% to 28%.

Trust in traditional media also continues to increase. According to the survey, trust in traditional media in the U.S. and Europe is higher than trust in search and social platforms. An earlier study from Gallup shows a similar rebound in media trust overall in the U.S.

 

Saving journalism. [updated 2/19/19]

Major Tech Cos to the Journalism Rescue.

In this week’s Axios Media Trends, we can read “Major tech companies and moguls are pouring lots of money into initiatives to support quality journalism, after months of bad headlines about fake news and the longer-term struggles of business models for journalism, especially at the local level.”

Doing it again.

Microsoft President is making a very interesting point:

“I think we should all care about high quality journalism. … I keep hoping that we’re gonna see the journalism profession come out the other end. Remember, a decade ago, people were saying, ‘Gee, there’s no future in high quality audio visual entertainment.’ It [was] being decimated by cable and then a new business model emerged.”
— Brad Smith

Facebook, Google: $300M each.

Large tech are showing signs of love to journalism. After the 200,000 free Google Suite account, Facebook and Google, each are granting $300M to news programs. WordPress is also investing “six figures” in The News Project, a full-service publishing platform specifically built for digital news publishers.

WordPress just announced Newspack in partnership with… Google.

“While local media might not get as much coverage as the national press, it serves an equally important role in society. That’s why the decline of local newsrooms in the U.S. has been a troublesome trend in recent years. The Google News Initiative is now partnering with WordPress to invest $1.2 million in creating a “fast, secure, low-cost publishing system tailor-made to the needs of small newsrooms” called Newspack (backed by Google, the Lenfest Institute, the Knight Foundation, and others.)

Journalism, the cure to media distrust.

As we wrote previously, quality journalism respecting privacy and transparency, delivering the brand values of the media they work for is the solution to the current distrust, driving to misinformation and, ultimately, to violence.

Top 2019 predictions: Privacy and Transparency

Optimism and method for greater trust in media.

A win-win relationship

Large tech, such as Facebook and Google need media. No trust in media means less dialogs online, less traffic for them.

By providing the framework to provide quality journalism AND a more sustainable business, large tech and medias are on a sound win-win relationship.

We will have to watch carefully the dependance on media businesses, but for now, we, at TrustedOut approve those initiatives helping our Corpus Intelligence with solid, well profiled medias.

Update: Pledges to save local news reach nearly $1 billion

Questions? Comments? Contact us!

Behind the Business Case #3: Country comparisons

To pursue on our Behind Business Cases with this 3rd example, we didn’t have the same questions with the field “Country” we had with “Out of Digital”. Country filters are obvious, in particular for marketers, but what didn’t expect was how on eye-opener it would be.

Import an existing Corpus into TrustedOut

Compare countries within the same Corpus

To discover the countries have very different profiles in particular, their taxonomies.

Comparing Apples to Apples

To avoid comparing Culture, Politics and Entertainment with Business, Society and Tech, TrustedOut can align those two countries and have you compare… apples to apples.

Full business case here

Top 2019 predictions: Privacy and Transparency

In this Forbes article, 12 C-level leaders share their predictions for 2019.

Top predictions, results of a lesson learned the hard way: 2019 will be the year of Privacy and transparency.

Hereafter are our favorite parts from the article:

In 2019, Marketers Will Strike the Right Balance of Personalization and Privacy.  Lynne Capozzi, CMO, Acquia

“… 2019 will be the year that marketers not only prioritize data privacy, but they start to get the balance right — offering the appropriate amount of personalization and privacy to build customer relationships based on trust. Consumers will continue to challenge brands to do so — otherwise they’ll move on. …”

Transparency Will Make Much Bigger Cracks Within the Digital Ecosystem as CMOs Prioritize Tech Partners.  Mike Pallad, President, Undertone (cross-platform synchronized digital marketing for the world’s most prominent brands)

“…In the coming year, the demand for transparency will finally force marketers to choose only the tech partners that most empower them to understand the reach, frequency, and impact of their campaigns (across all of their digital partners), allowing them to spend in the most intelligent ways….”

CMOs Will Stop “Going with Their Gut” And Truly Harness Data to Make Informed Decisions.  Matt Sweeney, President of Xaxis North America

86% of US brand marketers plan to invest in outcome-driven media over the next 2 years. In 2019, CMOs will make strides toward outcome-driven media, allowing them to tie their media metrics more directly to their business goals. … By truly harnessing their data, CMOs will no longer need to go with their gut instincts when making media investment decisions. They will be more agile with their budgets and media strategies, using data to deliver better returns and deliver the best consumer experiences.”

Better media, greater profiling.

Our takeaway here is two folds:

An opportunity for an improved trust in better media.

In our previous post, Optimism and method for greater trust in media., we wrote “to improve media should have Journalists to defend themselves and improve with more accuracy, more transparency and less bias with recognized sources and countered partisan perceptions led with their media brand values.”

This prediction confirms our reading of Gallup and Axios.

A strong need for media profiling.

As media strengthen their brand values and, at the same time, Marketers will get less intrusive customer data, they will rely, even more, on analyzing the media pulse within their well defined audiences. This is the market purpose of TrustedOut.

As this profiling must not be biased and permanently updated, only an AI-operated profiling can deliver this. This is the tech foundation of TrustedOut. 

Of course, do not hesitate to reach out if you have any questions.

 

Optimism and method for greater trust in media.

Better but still lower.

According to Axios, “efforts to bring transparency to media — including attempts by journalists to publicly defend their work, media literacy campaigns, more transparent funding and improved fact-checking partnerships — have helped the media recover a bit of trust with the public after hitting an all-time low in 2016″

How to continue to improve?

Journalists to defend themselves…

study from Louisiana State University’s Manship School of Mass Communication suggests that journalists can actually increase trust in the media by speaking out in defense of their profession …

… and improve with more accuracy, more transparency and less bias

… while also doing more fact checking.: Which is second with this “poll by Gallup and The Knight Foundation this year found that efforts to restore media trust among most Americans can work “particularly if those efforts are aimed at improving accuracy, enhancing transparency and reducing bias.”

… with recognized sources and countered partisan perceptions

“people are less likely to perceive a report or set of facts as being biased if they are unaware of the outlet producing them. It concludes that restoring trust in the news media may then require news companies to actually address and counter shared perceptions of bias and inaccuracy within partisan groups.”

… led with their media brand values.

“Transparency in funding can work, too, especially as more news organizations veer away from the advertising-funded model”.”Companies now have to lead with their values and offer transparency in the process,”

Sounds familiar? Yes. It’s all about Brands.

Not only, did we recently shared our takeaways from the 50 Big Ideas for 2019 and the desire for Trust in Brands but TrustedOut is based on the principle that branding in media is the sole solution to fight misinformation.

Values of a brand are the trustworthiness of a media,

A brand will fight for its value, here with media, for accuracy, for its perspective and tone and always deliver what you expect from this brand. An article may, accidentally, be wrong, an author may sometimes be wrong, the only safety net is the brand which will fight back, correct and improve.

In a chaotic and challenging environment, Brand values are the only solutions for stable trust.

Like with cars or food, some people may not like a brand and like another one, but those brands will always deliver, and fight for, the values you expect from them.

This is why, unsurprisingly, those surveys are aligned with our mission at TrustedOut: Focusing and profiling media brands so you can define those you trust and those you don’t. Define your corpus and feed your analytic tools or create your brand safety perimeter of your trust for your strategic decisions.

Did you know we have a FAQ page?