Behind the Business Case #3: Country comparisons

To pursue on our Behind Business Cases with this 3rd example, we didn’t have the same questions with the field “Country” we had with “Out of Digital”. Country filters are obvious, in particular for marketers, but what didn’t expect was how on eye-opener it would be.

Import an existing Corpus into TrustedOut

Compare countries within the same Corpus

To discover the countries have very different profiles in particular, their taxonomies.

Comparing Apples to Apples

To avoid comparing Culture, Politics and Entertainment with Business, Society and Tech, TrustedOut can align those two countries and have you compare… apples to apples.

Full business case here

Behind the business case #2: Media Metrics

Our content team worked very hard to define, what we hope is “the most comprehensive and media profiles database, and select all the necessary fields and always up-to-date taxonomy. Of course, this is an on-going process but so far….

We are today at 66 fields and 450 categories.

Along the way, we challenged ourselves on how insightful a field would be to decide to add it.

“Out of digital” is a field collecting all supports beyond online for a media, such as paper, radio, TV….

Now, the question is: Does it matter? or for TrustedOut goal…

Do Pure Players have an impact on your analytics?

We ran our Corpus Analytics on the Corpus used for the BPI Events:

And did an A/B testing, all media and Pure Players only with 2 versions of a Corpus using the very same analytics tools, here Netvibes, and arrive to the conclusion:

Yes, Pure Players influence your analytics.

So, we kept “Out of digital” for our Corpus Intelligence and now our AI keeps on updating it  at all time.

Continue reading the complete business case…

Products, Media, Movements leaders. All about Brand values.

Credits: LCI. Image taken from the article page.

The “Yellow Vests” movement in France is a very interesting event in media trust and interaction. Great reading with this article on lci, “Mobilization of the Yellow Vests: “The media is in a paradoxical position”” (in French) (Google translation in English here). Here are our 2 takeaways:

1. Beyond distrust, violence.

“Avoid Media to get informed” – Yellow Vest leader

The movement in the center of the news does not recognize itself when they watch the news. This creates a profound distrust driving to confrontation, and violence. “Between live shows showing the “truth” shared thousands of times, comments by hundreds insulting journalists, and even an event proposing to “besiege the media” – gatherings in front of television channels”

How to improve trust in media?

Optimism and method for greater trust in media.

In our blog post referenced above, we covered ways to improve the trust in media:

1/ Journalists to defend themselves
2/ and improve with more accuracy, more transparency and less bias
3/ with recognized sources and countered partisan perceptions
4/ led with their media brand values.

2. Trust what leaders trust.

“In seeking information online, Yellow Vests are also influenced by “messengers”, who themselves do not like the media… it is difficult to “prioritize what is most important, in terms of credibility, in the public’s choices”…

one of the most important criteria is the advice of peers, that is, people in whom I trust or resemble me”.”

From the article: One leader says he likes reading Russia Today, another likes someone “close to Dieudonné (convicted in court eight times on antisemitism) or Alain Soral (Critic of Capitalism, communitarianism, feminism, Zionism)”. In a stream of information without hierarchy, where a comment on Facebook, a live video or a media article have the same value, all truths would be good to take. Sometimes opening the door to conspiracy theories, as we have seen over the past few weeks.”

We are our education.

Don’t get us wrong here, we are not trying to denigrate this or any other movements. All this is fine as long as you are aware of who wrote what you read, which will drive your opinions, your decision-making and thus, who you are. In other words, gauge where information is coming from before doing anything with it. Think before you act. Gauge before you like, retweet, comment…

This is true at the individual level, reader, protester, thought leader, but even more true for businesses. How can you make strategic decisions — analytics/intelligence, ad placements or PR efforts — on content not corresponding to your trust criteria?? 

We covered some of this in this blog post about Trust over education stages, colleges and high school.

Media trust over education stages

Conclusion:

We are at a critical inflection point in the way we get and act upon our news. Trend, so far, has been to distrust media which moved readers to social networks. Numbers show there is even less trust in social media and echo chambers with closed groups can be a threat to democracy (France: 35% general news vs 19% social networks, USA: 34% general news vs 13% social networks). So, what do we do?

Media must be driven by their brand values.

See point #1 above and more in this blog post “Optimism and method for greater trust in media

Media must be profiled to be identified.

Yes, this is why we are doing TrustedOut. We will in production in early 2019 but are already accepting beta testers (interested? let us know asap).

While identifying who’s talking is mandatory to anything you do with any content, TrustedOut focused, for now, on Business to Business with…

IMMEDIATE BENEFITS FOR:

‣ Business Intelligence: Trust the Decisions you make with content you trust.
‣ Brand Safety: Define the perimeter of media you trust to promote your brand.
‣ PR Coverage: Set and compare different media groups by trust levels.

Questions? Please visit our FAQ or contact us!

 

“The overwhelming fakeness of today’s internet”

Less than 60% of today’s internet is human. The rest are bots.

Credits: Axios. Image taken off the article page.

Great article from Axios on today’s internet falseness.

Yes, we agree with theThe big picture.”

“Everything that once seemed definitively and unquestionably real now seems slightly fake; everything that once seemed slightly fake now has the power and presence of the real,” Max Read writes for New York Magazine.”

And yes, we also agree with “Why it matters.”

Legit media companies and businesses need to be making decisions for their human customers. That gets harder for everyone when bots and fake metrics swamp the internet.”

This sounds in line with our recent article Optimism and method for greater trust in media. and, of couse, our Corpus Intelligence.

Top 2019 predictions: Privacy and Transparency

In this Forbes article, 12 C-level leaders share their predictions for 2019.

Top predictions, results of a lesson learned the hard way: 2019 will be the year of Privacy and transparency.

Hereafter are our favorite parts from the article:

In 2019, Marketers Will Strike the Right Balance of Personalization and Privacy.  Lynne Capozzi, CMO, Acquia

“… 2019 will be the year that marketers not only prioritize data privacy, but they start to get the balance right — offering the appropriate amount of personalization and privacy to build customer relationships based on trust. Consumers will continue to challenge brands to do so — otherwise they’ll move on. …”

Transparency Will Make Much Bigger Cracks Within the Digital Ecosystem as CMOs Prioritize Tech Partners.  Mike Pallad, President, Undertone (cross-platform synchronized digital marketing for the world’s most prominent brands)

“…In the coming year, the demand for transparency will finally force marketers to choose only the tech partners that most empower them to understand the reach, frequency, and impact of their campaigns (across all of their digital partners), allowing them to spend in the most intelligent ways….”

CMOs Will Stop “Going with Their Gut” And Truly Harness Data to Make Informed Decisions.  Matt Sweeney, President of Xaxis North America

86% of US brand marketers plan to invest in outcome-driven media over the next 2 years. In 2019, CMOs will make strides toward outcome-driven media, allowing them to tie their media metrics more directly to their business goals. … By truly harnessing their data, CMOs will no longer need to go with their gut instincts when making media investment decisions. They will be more agile with their budgets and media strategies, using data to deliver better returns and deliver the best consumer experiences.”

Better media, greater profiling.

Our takeaway here is two folds:

An opportunity for an improved trust in better media.

In our previous post, Optimism and method for greater trust in media., we wrote “to improve media should have Journalists to defend themselves and improve with more accuracy, more transparency and less bias with recognized sources and countered partisan perceptions led with their media brand values.”

This prediction confirms our reading of Gallup and Axios.

A strong need for media profiling.

As media strengthen their brand values and, at the same time, Marketers will get less intrusive customer data, they will rely, even more, on analyzing the media pulse within their well defined audiences. This is the market purpose of TrustedOut.

As this profiling must not be biased and permanently updated, only an AI-operated profiling can deliver this. This is the tech foundation of TrustedOut. 

Of course, do not hesitate to reach out if you have any questions.

 

The ancestor of TrustedOut

In this documentary about Edward Bernays, the father of Public Relations (and Sigmund Freud’s nephew) from the BBC, which we highly recommand in its integrality, you can watch the impact of news manipulation and how officials advised citizens to qualify sources they trust. Sounds familiar?

80+ years later, with the help of AI and many other technologies, we now can have this qualification automated, on large scale, AI-operated unbiased and permanently update:  TrustedOut and its Corpus Intelligence.

Optimism and method for greater trust in media.

Better but still lower.

According to Axios, “efforts to bring transparency to media — including attempts by journalists to publicly defend their work, media literacy campaigns, more transparent funding and improved fact-checking partnerships — have helped the media recover a bit of trust with the public after hitting an all-time low in 2016″

How to continue to improve?

Journalists to defend themselves…

study from Louisiana State University’s Manship School of Mass Communication suggests that journalists can actually increase trust in the media by speaking out in defense of their profession …

… and improve with more accuracy, more transparency and less bias

… while also doing more fact checking.: Which is second with this “poll by Gallup and The Knight Foundation this year found that efforts to restore media trust among most Americans can work “particularly if those efforts are aimed at improving accuracy, enhancing transparency and reducing bias.”

… with recognized sources and countered partisan perceptions

“people are less likely to perceive a report or set of facts as being biased if they are unaware of the outlet producing them. It concludes that restoring trust in the news media may then require news companies to actually address and counter shared perceptions of bias and inaccuracy within partisan groups.”

… led with their media brand values.

“Transparency in funding can work, too, especially as more news organizations veer away from the advertising-funded model”.”Companies now have to lead with their values and offer transparency in the process,”

Sounds familiar? Yes. It’s all about Brands.

Not only, did we recently shared our takeaways from the 50 Big Ideas for 2019 and the desire for Trust in Brands but TrustedOut is based on the principle that branding in media is the sole solution to fight misinformation.

Values of a brand are the trustworthiness of a media,

A brand will fight for its value, here with media, for accuracy, for its perspective and tone and always deliver what you expect from this brand. An article may, accidentally, be wrong, an author may sometimes be wrong, the only safety net is the brand which will fight back, correct and improve.

In a chaotic and challenging environment, Brand values are the only solutions for stable trust.

Like with cars or food, some people may not like a brand and like another one, but those brands will always deliver, and fight for, the values you expect from them.

This is why, unsurprisingly, those surveys are aligned with our mission at TrustedOut: Focusing and profiling media brands so you can define those you trust and those you don’t. Define your corpus and feed your analytic tools or create your brand safety perimeter of your trust for your strategic decisions.

Did you know we have a FAQ page?

 

Trust by political party and Presidential elections

In this 2018 Gallup survey, a clear split between political parties is noticeable, but even more interesting is crossing Presidential elections with this chart.

Losing raises trust.

In America, when you lose a Presidential election (Democrats and Republicans), your trust in media goes up the year after.

2016. Donald Trump (Republican).

Winners: Republicans. Down the election year. Flat the year after.

Losers: Democrats. Down the election year. Up the year after.

2012. Barack Obama (Democrat).

Losers: Republicans. Down the election year. Up the year after.

Winners: Democrats. Flat election year, Flat the year after.

2008. Barack Obama (Democrat).

Losers: Republicans. Down the election year. Up the year after.

Winners: Democrats. Down election year, Down the year after.

2004. George H. Bush (Republican).

Winners: Republicans. Down the election year. Flat the year after.

Losers: Democrats. Down election year. Up the year after.

2000. George H. Bush (Republican).

Winners: Republicans. Flat the election year. Down the year after.

Losers: Democrats. Down election year. Up the year after.

Interesting.

Now, do Political orientations within your Corpus of content impact analytics?

Answer is here…

 

Our take on LinkedIn’s 50 Big Ideas for 2019

Credits: LinkedIn

We liked this LinkedIn’s post and wanted hereafter to share our takeaways (@X refers to the Big Idea X):

The desire.

A. The desire for Trust in Businesses.

Via paying local taxes and regulations @#9. “Governments will seize the opportunity to regulate Big Tech.” and @42. “Order comes to the Wild West of data collection”

Via a clear fear of sizes getting too big “before it’s outside our control and we can’t see the consequences of it” @31. “Businesses will favor integrity over growth.”

B. The desire for Trust in exchanges.

@37. “We will reach peak outrage.

In the last couple of years, public opinion has been driven by “polarized tribes,” says Willow Bay, dean of the USC Annenberg School of Communication and Journalism: “Outrage has been modified, optimized, personalized and, of course, monetized.” Outrage, like fear, is helpful in the short term but unsustainable in the long term, she says. “Many do not want to live in a state of semi-permanent outrage, they’re simply tired of it,” she adds. “And I believe increasingly, people are going to want to reclaim consensus, collaboration and shared values rather than polarizing ones.” While Bay is referring to the United States, any country where people discuss politics on social media will recognize a version of this. She points to a study by More In Common which showed that 67% of Americans did not conform to partisan ideology or had disengaged from politics. They’ve been dubbed the “exhausted majority.””

And, @43. “We will ask ourselves hard questions about what free speech means.”, the classic “Free speech vs diversity and inclusion” on which we posted this a few days ago: “Media trust over education stages

C. The desire for Trust in Brands

@45. “Brands won’t be able to stay neutral. Consumers and employees increasingly expect companies to take a position on the day’s issues and live their values…”

This needs for Brand values to be shared and stood for is in line with the role of Brands as explained and applied by Edward Bernays.

Of course, Brands applies to media brands and thus the need to profile them to build your perimeter of trust, mandatory to feed your analytic tools and guarantee your Brand Safety. This is what TrustedOut is about.

The need.

The need for AI.

@#7. “AI will be in every industry and every job”. Of course, we agree. We are using AI to avoid human physical limitations and bias.

Another way to say it is we believe AI is an element of the desire for Trust.

The need for ethic in AI.

We are aware of the risk of a fraudulent, oriented AI. IBM launched a tool to detect bias in AI , the excellent “Weapons of Math Destruction” (PDF here) and many more… This is why transparency with our AI is key to us, we will not have human entries so everything can be explained, nothing will be editorialized, no judgment, just collections and classifications machine-driven.

This is also why we were super proud to be finalist at the recent “The Robot of the Year” event, focused on Ethic AI.

Reminder: We solely focus on media profiling and are not doing any article fact checking, nor author scoring (Question #4 in our FAQ)