Trust, Media and Democracy

click here to read report

The Aspen Institute and the Knight Foundation recently released a report on a commission they organized about Trust, Media and Democracy. While coming from America, we believe most can apply wider.

If you don’t have the time for the length report, this medium page is very interesting. Here are our takeaways in the light of our previous posts, regrouped in 3 main categories:

10 ways to rebuild trust in media and democracy

Before starting up, we can not resist to simply cut and paste the introduction paragraph: “Our nation is experiencing a crisis of trust. We believe that reliable news is vital to our democracy, but many of us can’t name an objective news source. Concern about “fake news” is high, but we can’t agree on what that means. We can’t even assume every American is operating under the same set of facts. We retreat to polarized political tribes and don’t want to listen to anyone outside them.” – Superbly written and so much in alignment with what we believe and the motivation to create TrustedOut.

Of course, the purpose here is not a posture of “we know better” but rather than copycatting what the article says, simply note we wrote about most of those points and thus, are in agreement with them.

a/ Privacy and Transparency (#1, 5 & 6)

Top 2019 predictions: Privacy and Transparency

b/ Financial support (#2, 3, 4 & 7)

Saving journalism.

c/ Education (#8, 9 & 10)

Media trust over education stages

Feedback welcome. Go the bottom of any TrustedOut.com page…

Consumer trust is a vital and a key differentiator for publishers

Image taken from article in reference

Can’t resist just cutting and pasting the very first sentence here “Consumer trust is a vital and a key differentiator for publishers in a competitive environment. Fostering trust, prioritizing consumer rights and offering transparency of data practices is more important than ever before for premium publishers.” from this article from Digital Content Next

Sounds like our previous post on TrustedOut Market, doesn’t it?

So, unsurprisingly, we loved this article. Here are our takeaways:

Gap between trust in traditional and social media is now at an all-time high.

  • The US and Canada and European markets also registered significant trust in traditional media and search compared to social media. Trust in traditional media is at its highest-ever historical level at 65% in US and Canada and 60% in Europe, trust in search at 61% and 59%, respectively. However, rust in social media in both markets is at 34%.
  • The percentage gap between trust in traditional and social media is now at an all-time high of 31-points in US and Canada and a 26-point gap in Europe.
  • In terms of political differences, consumers who identify as Republican voters show only 33% trust in media compared to 69% of Democrats voters.

#MeToo shift from the “mass population” to the “informed public

Further, more women, think that the #metoo movement, (plus 23 percentage points year-over-year) than men (plus 18 percentage points) shift from the “mass population” to the “informed public” segment.

CEO to take the lead. Don’t wait for government!

People are also looking to leaders to take charge and initiate change. More than three-quarters (76%) of respondents report that CEOs should take the lead on change rather than waiting for government to impose it.

First priority: equal pay. Last: fake news

Specific needs for positive change include: equal pay (65%), prejudice and discrimination (64%), training for jobs of tomorrow (64%), environment (56%), personal data (55%), sexual harassment (47%) and fake news (37%). 

TrustedOut’s market

In its latest report on Social Intelligence, Forrester writes, straight right from the beginning:

Enterprises Are Still Not Using Social Intelligence To Its Full Potential” 

“Social Listening Platforms’ Current Offerings All Look Alike

Each social listening platform provider emphasizes its unique applicability and use across the enterprise. But each vendor also parades a roster of features and functionalities that largely look the same from one to the next. Buyers will struggle to distinguish major differences between each vendor’s current offering because social listening platforms all rely on the same data sources as the foundation of their platforms. … most vendors in this evaluation tap into the same third-party aggregators such as webhose.io for web content, LexisNexis or Factiva for news, … Social listening platform shoppers may find the breadth of data sources an important selection factor, but the discernment of data differentiation becomes increasingly difficult when all vendors source from the same well. ”  – Forrester, Q3’18

We couldn’t agree more.

Even more if you add the current crisis of distrust in content. Magnified but far, far more complex than just some fact checking to feel better with fake news being fixed. No, fake news are just the tip of the iceberg. The issue of trust in news and information in general is to, first understand who is talking before listening to anything they say, and then, ultimately taking any action.

The immense problem today is to not profile who is talking and thus, the trust you can put in the publisher, before spreading and commenting which means adding your intrinsic support.

Intelligence needs data.

Nothing new here. AI with its deep and machine learning, needs data. Analysts need data… any kind of intelligence needs data.

Social Intelligence needs data.

Forrester makes a point by saying there is no differentiation of the offer because there is no differentiation of the data used for the Social Intelligence. Of course, we agree and that’s the foundation of TrustedOut: providing profiled media sources. Let’s have a look at the 3 references mentioned by Forrester:

Webhose.io, Factiva and LexisNexis are all about articles. We believe Media is what matters.

Webhose.io claims to be “Data As A Service”, provides articles. Factiva (Dow Jones) does the same but claims to be curated by (lots of) humans. LexisNexis does the same but focused on legal.

We totally respect those three and in no way, are we judging them. We are just saying they, all three, take an “article” approach. You could also get your articles by the author name but none is scoring them.

None of them is focusing on the media itself. TrustedOut does. Here is why:

Trust is based on a reputation. An article does not have a reputation.

An author may have a reputation but is temporary and linked to a matter.

A publisher brand definitely has a reputation and its values guarantee stability.

Bottom line: Your Trust is based on the publisher brands you value.

This is why TrustedOut is an AI-Operated profiling media database offering our clients to define their trust via sophisticated queries (65+ fields and 400+ categories) because ONLY you can define your own trust. No-one can tell you what you trust.

The distrust fix is in giving you the tools to define what you trust.

Update: Digital Content Next wrote recentlyConsumer trust is a vital and a key differentiator for publishers in a competitive environment. Fostering trust, prioritizing consumer rights and offering transparency of data practices is more important than ever before for premium publishers.”. This could be from us.

Company sizes.

LexisNexis has 10,000+ employees and $2.8 Billions in revenue, 5M users and is available in 175 countries.

Factiva was bought by Dow Jones in 2006 for $160 Millions when their revenue was $290 Millions, used by 1.8M users and 80% of the Fortune Global 500.

Webhose.io is a younger independent company out of Tel Aviv claiming 35,000 registered users, $5.5M in revenue and 115 languages.

Market is growing fast.

$4B in 2018 and according to BusinessWire: “The Global Social Media Analytics Market size is expected to reach $11.6 billion by 2023, rising at a market growth of 28.6% CAGR during the forecast period.”

Various Sector Demands is growing fast.

“Asset managers double spending on new data in hunt for edge” – Financial Times

“Investment groups have more than doubled their spending on new digital information sets and data scientists in the past two years… Asset managers last year spent a total of $373m on data sets and hiring new employees to parse them, up 60 per cent on 2016, and will probably spend a total of $616m this year, according to a survey of investors by AlternativeData.org, a trade body for the industry. It forecasts that overall expenditures will climb to over $1bn by 2020″

So, demand is fast growing…. better use content you trust.

Taxonomy fun facts (as of today!)

Taxonomy DNA for The New York Times – Tech section

In these 2 recent posts, we announced our AI-operated Taxonomy…

Introducing Taxonomy DNA

Taxonomy DNA (cont.) – comparing a specialist vs a generalist

… time now to share some fun facts about it:

10,000,000 words

is the dictionary of words used for the qualification of our taxonomy classifications. Those words were precisely selected to be meaningful for each of our taxonomy classifications (leaves).

100,000 new article abstracts collected daily.

Every day, 100k article abstracts are collected. This number should grow to 1 million a day within 3 months.

75,000 operations per article

… to classify within our taxonomy every single article for every single day for every single feed for every single media.

8 Billions classification operations daily

This is growing daily and should reach 50 to 70B shortly.

Allowing for sophisticated Taxonomy classifications filters.

Thereafter is an example of how to filter classifications and depth of specialization per classification (we’ll dig into this more in a coming post) for your corpus:

Corpus creation and maintenance (may change)

Of course, should you have questions, let us know!

The incredible story of a 10 year long fake, success story.

For 10 years. Fake pharmaceutical, fake CEO, real top-notch business school.

It’s the real story of the fake story of Berden and its CEO. Both are the result of a top notch curriculum at HEC in France. [HBR story here]. The course is to control Enterprise reputation and the challenge was to create a Co., Berden, and its CEO, Eric Dumontpierre. And the success was incredible. For 10 years, the CEO was beloved, the company was super visible, to the point a real competitor sent a cease and decease for a… fake product of fake Berden.

The trick: Do not talk to medias

“The students had only one constraint to respect: not to communicate directly with the media. They had to build their reputation organically, by building an online ecosystem of websites and social network accounts where they would publish press releases and other information about the company, its history and activities.”

The method: Spread false…

Recent studies show that false information is easier to peddle than true information

… bold…

Research on the dissemination of “fake news” shows that students have used communication techniques identified decades ago by researchers as drivers of this phenomenon. Readers are more likely to circulate strong stories that evoke emotions such as fear (river pollution), disgust (child labour) and surprise or joy (32-hour work week) than smooth stories.

… repeat, until it sounds true.

Researchers have shown that repetition increases perceived veracity. In other words, familiarity induces credibility.

The fix: Trust profiled medias.

As previously written here, the solution to avoid this chaos is for medias to have clear values delivered and defended by professional journalists. THE weak point, the trick used here is the absence of contact with medias.

Absence of media opens the door to total chaos in education, opinions and decision-making. TrustedOut Corpus Intelligence is here to profile a totally unbiased, AI-Operated, Media database so Intelligence tools are fed with the content business analysts trust.

 

Social vs Traditional Media Analytics.

Do they compare? Are they opposed? Is one already over? 

Yes, Social Media have changed and are changing Business Intelligence. But, while Social Media are definitely newer than traditional media, does it mean, one should be considered and not the other?

How do Social Media and Traditional Media compare?

According to Wikipedia: Social media outlets operate in a dialogic transmission system (many sources to many receivers). This is in contrast to traditional media which operates under a monologic transmission model (one source to many receivers)”

We agree.

Monitoring and Listening apply to both Social and Traditional Media.

“Social monitoring is identifying and responding to individual brand mentions on social media. Social listening, on the other hand, is collecting data from those social mentions and broader customer conversations, and pulling insights from them so you can make better decisions for your customers… Social monitoring is reactive. … where social listening, which is proactive,… allows brands to take those short-term interactions and build them to glean insights for a long-term strategy. … Through social listening, you can also unearth trends among your industry, competitors, and consumer experiences. You can then make necessary changes to stay ahead of the curve and keep customers happy.”- Sprinklr

We agree. For both. Monitoring and Listening apply to Social and Traditional Media. Monitoring is the PR/Alert and Listening is the Intelligence/Analytics part. Matter of fact, the Sprinklr post goes on with metaphors:

“There are many metaphors you can use to make this distinction clearer. Social monitoring is the trees; social listening is the forest. Social monitoring is the pixels; social listening is the picture. Social monitoring is the bandaid; social listening helps you find the cure.”

We agree again. All apply to both Social and Traditional Media.

Social and Traditional Analytics are both mandatory.

From the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA): “Therefore, thinking about both (social and traditional) as steps within finding, converting and keeping customers seems like a mentality shift we all need to make. This has already proven true… the smartest tactics from advertising, public relations, marketing and editorial together, regardless of the type of media. In essence, [clients] are merging social and traditional rather than thinking of them separately.”The Digital Research and Analytics group, a subset of Ketchum 

The mandatory need to profile what you are listening to.

The very same way you want to understand who is talking in Social Media Listening, you must profile the Traditional Media you are analyzing to understand who is talking in Traditional Media Listening.

Intelligence In makes Intelligence Out.

Not knowing the profile of the media you are using for your analytics means not knowing what comes out of your analytics tools.

In other words, not profiling what you feed your tools with, means you are totally wasting your time and money.

All intelligence processes are made or broken by the quality of what they are fed with.

Would you trust, and make decisions based on a survey where you don’t trust the sample used for that survey? (Here’s the wikipedia page on Survey methodology explaining sampling) and thus…

Corpus Intelligence makes Intelligence trustworthy.

TrustedOut Full Overview | Business cases: Content orientations | Media metrics impact | Country comparisons

Update: Traditional news media are back

in the just released Edelman Trusted Barometer

  • The number of respondents who consume traditional news weekly or more, and share or post news content several times a month or more, has increased by 14 percentage points from 26% to 40%.
  • Those who consume traditional news weekly or more has risen by 8 percentage points from 24% to 32%.
  • Inversely, the number of people who say they consume traditional news less than weekly has dropped by over 20 percentage points from 49% to 28%.

Trust in traditional media also continues to increase. According to the survey, trust in traditional media in the U.S. and Europe is higher than trust in search and social platforms. An earlier study from Gallup shows a similar rebound in media trust overall in the U.S.

 

Our new site is live!

Photo credits: Florent Solt (yes, our Florent!)
Photo credit: Florent Solt (yes, our CTO and co-founder!)

The new TrustedOut.com

… is designed to be clearer, cleaner, more efficient and optimized for mobile.

Thanks everyone for your feedback and suggestions on the previous version of our site and special thanks to our beta testers. Seems you all love this new version. We couldn’t be happier!

Et bien sur, TrustedOut.fr

… pour le site en Français.

Saving journalism. [updated 2/19/19]

Major Tech Cos to the Journalism Rescue.

In this week’s Axios Media Trends, we can read “Major tech companies and moguls are pouring lots of money into initiatives to support quality journalism, after months of bad headlines about fake news and the longer-term struggles of business models for journalism, especially at the local level.”

Doing it again.

Microsoft President is making a very interesting point:

“I think we should all care about high quality journalism. … I keep hoping that we’re gonna see the journalism profession come out the other end. Remember, a decade ago, people were saying, ‘Gee, there’s no future in high quality audio visual entertainment.’ It [was] being decimated by cable and then a new business model emerged.”
— Brad Smith

Facebook, Google: $300M each.

Large tech are showing signs of love to journalism. After the 200,000 free Google Suite account, Facebook and Google, each are granting $300M to news programs. WordPress is also investing “six figures” in The News Project, a full-service publishing platform specifically built for digital news publishers.

WordPress just announced Newspack in partnership with… Google.

“While local media might not get as much coverage as the national press, it serves an equally important role in society. That’s why the decline of local newsrooms in the U.S. has been a troublesome trend in recent years. The Google News Initiative is now partnering with WordPress to invest $1.2 million in creating a “fast, secure, low-cost publishing system tailor-made to the needs of small newsrooms” called Newspack (backed by Google, the Lenfest Institute, the Knight Foundation, and others.)

Journalism, the cure to media distrust.

As we wrote previously, quality journalism respecting privacy and transparency, delivering the brand values of the media they work for is the solution to the current distrust, driving to misinformation and, ultimately, to violence.

Top 2019 predictions: Privacy and Transparency

Optimism and method for greater trust in media.

A win-win relationship

Large tech, such as Facebook and Google need media. No trust in media means less dialogs online, less traffic for them.

By providing the framework to provide quality journalism AND a more sustainable business, large tech and medias are on a sound win-win relationship.

We will have to watch carefully the dependance on media businesses, but for now, we, at TrustedOut approve those initiatives helping our Corpus Intelligence with solid, well profiled medias.

Update: Pledges to save local news reach nearly $1 billion

Questions? Comments? Contact us!

Behind the Business Case #3: Country comparisons

To pursue on our Behind Business Cases with this 3rd example, we didn’t have the same questions with the field “Country” we had with “Out of Digital”. Country filters are obvious, in particular for marketers, but what didn’t expect was how on eye-opener it would be.

Import an existing Corpus into TrustedOut

Compare countries within the same Corpus

To discover the countries have very different profiles in particular, their taxonomies.

Comparing Apples to Apples

To avoid comparing Culture, Politics and Entertainment with Business, Society and Tech, TrustedOut can align those two countries and have you compare… apples to apples.

Full business case here

Behind the business case #2: Media Metrics

Our content team worked very hard to define, what we hope is “the most comprehensive and media profiles database, and select all the necessary fields and always up-to-date taxonomy. Of course, this is an on-going process but so far….

We are today at 66 fields and 450 categories.

Along the way, we challenged ourselves on how insightful a field would be to decide to add it.

“Out of digital” is a field collecting all supports beyond online for a media, such as paper, radio, TV….

Now, the question is: Does it matter? or for TrustedOut goal…

Do Pure Players have an impact on your analytics?

We ran our Corpus Analytics on the Corpus used for the BPI Events:

And did an A/B testing, all media and Pure Players only with 2 versions of a Corpus using the very same analytics tools, here Netvibes, and arrive to the conclusion:

Yes, Pure Players influence your analytics.

So, we kept “Out of digital” for our Corpus Intelligence and now our AI keeps on updating it  at all time.

Continue reading the complete business case…