Brand Safety Violations: Consumers question brand’s motives.

Wonder what a brand safety violation means for your customers or prospects? This article from Marketing Dive explains:

Consumers believe brands intentionally place ads next to unsafe content, study says

Why? Because…

People believe advertisers picked where their ads will be placed.

“When people see online ads, they assume the advertiser picked that location intentionally. But that’s typically not the case. Even though organizations rarely select where web ads appear, ads paired with what your members may consider inappropriate content can have a nasty impact on your association’s brand, according to Daniel Avital, chief strategy officer at security and brand-safety firm CHEQ.” says this article on AssociationsNow

“75% of companies report being exposed to brand safety issues, but only 26% have taken some kind of action, and 15% haven’t adjusted their strategies at all.” – MarketingDive

“Seventy-five percent of companies report being exposed to brand safety issues, but only 26% have taken some kind of action, and 15% haven’t adjusted their strategies at all, according to research by GumGum and Custom. Another study by Sizmek found that four in 10 brands report delivering ads on unsafe websites, but 64% find it tough to implement an effective brand safety strategy, and 64% think achieving brand safety can negatively impact how quickly a campaign optimizes.”

“Whitelisting, which only allows ads to be placed in approved environments, may in fact be the best brand safety insurance.” – AdWeek

But, as Marketing Dive adds: “A simple solution is for associations to blacklist certain websites, so ads can’t appear on them, and then to whitelist sites they consider safe. While this is better than an approach that takes no precautions, Avital says new sites can always crop up that aren’t on the blacklist. And whitelisting severely limits the sites that ads can appear on, meaning organizations may not be reaching the people they would like to.”

The solution: Whitelisting from TrustedOut’s AI-Profiled Media database. Safe, large, unbiased, universal, up-to-date:

Related post:

Media profiles are key to Business Intelligence and Advertising. [updated]

Questions? Contact us!

 

54.6% US CMOs reviewed their agency relationships because of Brand Safety

Credits: eMarketer

The Brand Safety Dilemma.

In its report, eMarketing writes: “Virtually all brands are making changes in how they operate in digital media to be safer going forward. This includes demanding more transparency and investing more ad dollars in quality environments.”

We could not agree more.

TrustedOut offers to fix Brand Safety with its AI-Operated Whitelisting.

Question? Contact us!

 

Is the open web in danger?

In this post we’ll be sharing our takeaways from a recent AdAge article: OPINION: THE CLOSED NATURE OF THE OPEN WEB

Few have become the gatekeepers for the many, both in terms of information and advertising..”

We highly recommend reading the article but, let’s jump straight to the opinion exposed for today: “Right now, the few have become the gatekeepers for the many, both in terms of information and advertising. From the information standpoint, alarms have been sounded, and players in Washington have begun discussing possible breakups of big tech in earnest. So where are the alarms on the advertising side?”

For the information part, we agree.

As we wrote in a previous post:

Saving journalism. [updated 2/19/19]

Trust, Media and Democracy

For the advertising part: Do not put all your Advertising eggs in the same Social Networks baskets.

We were sensitive to 3 arguments:

“…rewarding harmful content while decreasing the funding for quality journalism.”

“The fueling of unsafe environments
When advertising on the major tech platforms, advertisers are valuing all content the same, whether it’s high-quality journalism or user-generated rants. In doing so, they fuel the unsafe moments they are trying to avoid. The irony is that many advertisers are only willing to pause their YouTube spends, but they’ll fully eliminate advertising around quality news content—rewarding harmful content while decreasing the funding for quality journalism.”

Is a Social Network context, the most appropriate for your brand message?

“Proper context
If you’re only advertising on Facebook (or Google, Amazon, you name it), then you’re only reaching an audience when they’re in their Facebook (or Google, Amazon, etc.) mindset. And that’s perhaps not the mindset most conducive to your messaging and goals. On the open web, advertisers can target their ads not only by audience, but also around high-value, relevant content that puts a halo around their brands. Quite simply, contextual advertising works. When consumers see messaging that is relevant to their interests, in the moment that they’re indulging those interests, that messaging is far more likely to resonate.

Valuing social engagement over brand engagement.

“Negative brand value
The very design of these platforms is intended to strip away brand. People don’t say, “I saw a GM ad.” They say, “I saw a Facebook ad.” These platforms’ greatest trick has been to get CMOs to value social engagement over brand engagement. This is the exact opposite of what advertising is supposed to accomplish.

Mandatory Source Profile:
According to TrustedOut AI-Operated Taxonomy, AdAge is:

Specialized in:
General › Economy And Enterprise › Marketing
Industries › Information And Communication › Online Media
Industries › Manufacturing And Retail › Consumer Goods
People › Entertainment And Leisure › TV And Video And WebTV
People › Lifestyle › Food And Beverage

What do you think? Let us know!

 

Need for Media Profiles Lists? Unilever agrees.

[click to read article]

[Source and credits: AdAge]

On Monday, we wrote:

Media profiles are key to Business Intelligence and Advertising.

Unilever launches “Trusted Publisher” list.

AdAge writes: “Unilever is launching a Trusted Publishers network that goes beyond the standard audience-verification, anti-fraud and brand-safety guidelines of most marketer ‘whitelists.'”

“Both the publishers and the criteria will be continuously re-assessed”

“We’re aiming to have as many publishers as possible, but they need to go through these selection criteria,” DiComo says. Both the publishers and the criteria will be continuously re-assessed, he says, “because the space is moving so quickly.”

Unilever’s initiative is logic.

Knowing: 4 in 10 brands deliver ads on unsafe sites – Cision

Consequently: 70% implement black or white lists…

… but 64% fear negative impacts on performance.  71% fear to not achieve reach while delivering to the right audience in the right context. – Cision & Digiday

Consequently, the solution is to:

1/ Have marketers define their white lists themselves for each campaign, each brand. And align in each country.

2/ Have those lists automatically built, maintained and updated, directly serving the trading desk.

Bottom line: Keep your Brand Safe, let TrustedOut manage your white lists.

Watch a demo.

Contact us:

 

 

Media profiles are key to Business Intelligence and Advertising. [updated]

Example of a taxonomy DNA: BHG.com
Mouse over to zoom

Click to zoom

Media profiling:
Collection and Classification.

TrustedOut profiles media via data collection to gather intangible data and content classification to evaluate expertise and perception.

Data collection.

From a domain, here for our example, bhg.com, TrustedOut will collect a lot of intangible data such as: its name: Better Homes and Gardens, the owner, here, Meredith Corporation, the organization type, here it’s a Private company, find if content orientations are declared, here, no political, no religious orientations, the online traffic, the revenue, the number of employees, etc, etc…

All those informations are important when defining what the analyst, the CMO, the ad agency, trust, and want to base intelligence, fully ensure brand safety, understand who’s receptive to a message, a promotion, etc…

Content classification.

Content classification is used primarily for our taxonomy and to understand how an information source is perceived, like “spotted as” fake news, junk science, conspiracy theory…

Here’s how it works:

Mouse over to zoom

Let’s have look at BHG.com’s taxonomy.

As described above, our AI-operated taxonomy permanently assesses where the site is good at, meaning non only, the subjects covered, but also, the level of expertise.

Another view of BHG.com’s taxonomy is below with the top classification level and a drill down on this top level, here: People.

Our taxonomy tells us BHG is Specialized in:

People
People › Entertainment And Leisure
People › Entertainment And Leisure › Gardening
People › Entertainment And Leisure › DIY (Do It Yourself)
People › Lifestyle
People › Lifestyle › Food And Beverage (yes! BHG has a recipes section)
People › Lifestyle › Decoration And Design And Architecture Specialized
People › Lifestyle › Home

and BHG covers the following:

People › Society › Family
People › Culture And Arts › Museum And Exhibition
People › Lifestyle › Feminine
People › Culture And Arts › Movies
People › Sports › Gymnastics And Fitness And Yoga
People › Sports › Horse Riding
People › Education › Preschool And Primary School
Sciences › Medicine And Health › Personal Health
Industries › Transportation › Bus

… and BHG has a Limited coverage in:

Sciences › Human Sciences › Sociology

Machine learning operates our Taxonomy and online perception to keep our database of media profiles, unbiased, universal and always up-to-date.

Importance for Business Intelligence:
No trust, no Intelligence.

Say you are in the food market and want to understand how some cuisine types are perceived amongst specialized publications in America:

To feed your intelligence tools, such as Digimind (demo here), your Corpus will look like this.

16,000+ sources (49k new articles abstracts a day) will ensure you analyze, and thus base your strategic decisions, on content you define.

Would you have thought Better Homes and Gardens would be part of your Corpus? At first, Home and Garden does not sound like Food and beverage specialist, does it? (well, if you are looking for Chicken recipes, it’s here).

This anecdote is to point out the need for both an unbiased and universal classification and a depth of expertise from the content you will base your decisions on.

It is critical you trust the right, and all the right, publications to trust any intelligence coming out of those publications. Depth and width.

No Trust, No Intelligence.

Importance for Advertising:
Brand Safety and Budget Optimization.

Here, you want to advertise your new product to the US Food Market. Keeping your brand safe will be your top priority… After all, you will pay to increase your business, not ruin the brand reputation it took you years to build.

Brand Safety is top priority for CEOs and CMOs.

For your online ad campaign, the trading desk of your advertising agency will define the query, with, amongst other things, desired and not-desired keywords, to select the content you trust compatible with your brand.

But a page can match all those criteria but be published on a site not safe or compatible with the advertiser’s brand. You must also select the publications you trust compatible with your brand.

Otherwise, your brand is at risk. And advertisers know and fear it:

4 in 10 brands deliver ads on unsafe sites – Cision

The only solution for the CMO to be certain to keep brands safe: Define himself the lists of publications he trusts compatible with her/his brands.

Consequence:

70% implement black or white lists… – Digiday

But while the vast majority is using lists, the vast majority is unhappy with the solution. As of today:

… but 64% fear negative impacts on performance.  71% fear to not achieve reach while delivering to the right audience in the right context. – Cision

Consequently, the solution is to:

1/ Have marketers define their white lists themselves for each campaign, each brand. And align in each country.

2/ Have those lists automatically built, maintained and updated, directly serving the trading desk.

Bottom line: Keep your Brand Safe, let TrustedOut manage your white lists.

Let’s go back to our US Food Market example. Our marketer, here, wants to build a white list of US based publications, specialized in Food and Beverage and also wants them to be in business for more than 3 years, not politically, nor religiously oriented and, of course, not spotted as fake news, hate news or junk science.

Corpus looks like above and now more than 9,000+ sources are immediately available to be imported or live feeding your trading desk.

Trading desk runs its query within the perimeter of the white list. Best of both worlds, search and directory.
Brand is now totally safe.

Run more where it returns more.

In addition, Media Profiles bring ad budget optimization.

By adding media profiles to a campaign report, marketers and agencies can surface media with the best ROI and thus, increase budgets where return is optimal.

BHG works best for your campaign? Let’s get more of this profile and spend your ad budget where it makes the most sense.

Update:

AdWeek just published this article “The Areas Where Brand Safety Measures Fall Short” and wrote

“Whitelisting, which only allows ads to be placed in approved environments, may in fact be the best brand safety insurance.”

Questions? Shoot!

 

Developed nations distrust Social Networks, Developing ones don’t.

This post is inspired from this The Guardian (UK Edition) article

More than four in five Britons distrust platforms such as Facebook and Twitter…

“…with other developed nations such as France, Germany and the US not far behind. The attitudes contrast sharply with those in middle-income countries such as Brazil, India and Mexico, where trust is far higher…. just 12% trusted information from social media, compared with 83% who had little or no trust in platforms such as Facebook and Twitter.

Less than 30% trust in Social Networks in developed nations, more than 50% in developing ones.

“In all, 23% of Americans said they trusted information gained from social media, as did 20% of Germans, and 28% of Canadians. In developing nations, however, the trust was much higher: a majority of Indians (52%), Saudis (52%) and Thais (52%) trusted information from social media – as did 51% of Poles.”

UK and US do trust Local news orgs.

“Just two sources of information were trusted by a majority of Britons: national TV news channels (61%) and local news organisations (54%). Only the US was more mistrusting of information sources in general. According to the polling, local news organisations are the sole news sources that are trusted by a majority of Americans (58%).”

Cambridge Analytica, Christchurch, US Elections… all had a toll on Social Networks.

“The Cambridge Analytica scandal highlighted big tech’s ability and willingness to harvest data and subvert democracy, while the Christchurch shooting is the latest example of terrorism encouraged by online radicalisation.

YouTube has continually been found showing inappropriate content to children, and all the social networks have been implicated in nation-state information warfare, beginning with Russian trolls uncovered on Twitter after the US election.”

The desire for regularization.

“Episodes such as these explain why Britain is leading calls for increased levels of regulation of social media and technology companies. More than 60% of Britons think those businesses should be regulated more than they are now, compared with just 6% who think there is too much regulation and 15% who think there is the right amount.”

Social Media vs Traditional Media

From a previous post:

Get information from Traditional Media, have conversation on Social Media. Not the other way around.

Must gauge who’s talking.

We are basing this post on theguardian.com UK Edition. Prior to write anything, we, of course, use TrustedOut to understand who they are.

They are no spotted as any toxic content, such as fake news, fake sciences, conspiracist… But are they knowledgeable about publishing? Let’s ask for TrustedOut Taxonomy:

TheGuardian.com UK Edition classified by TrustedOut AI-Operated Taxonomy.

We decided they were legit and wrote this post.

Questions? Shoot!

 

 

In Europe, for the 1st time, written press is more trusted than distrusted.

Credits: EBU

This post is our takeaways from an advanced-television.com article and an EBU (European Broadcasting Union) report.

In Europe, Social media and the Internet are much more distrusted than trusted. It’s the reverse for Radio and TV.

Radio is the most trusted medium by EU citizens – trusted by 59% of the population with half of all EU citizens trusting TV.

Only 32% trust the Internet. 19% trust social networks.

On the other hand, the internet is trusted by only 32% of citizens and social media by 19% (down from 36% and 21% respectively in 2014).

Correlation between national news trustworthiness and democracy.

A positive correlation between the perceived trustworthiness of national news and citizens’ satisfaction with democracy means radio and television are indispensable assets for European society.

Related posts:

The decline of local newspapers impact on democracy.

Trust, Media and Democracy

Must gauge who’s talking.

We are basing this post on advanced-television.com. Prior to write anything, we, of course, use TrustedOut to understand who they are.

They are no spotted as any toxic content, such as fake news, fake sciences, conspiracist… But are they knowledgeable about publishing? Let’s ask for TrustedOut Taxonomy:

Advanced-television classified by TrustedOut AI-Operated Taxonomy.

We decided they were legit and wrote this post.

Questions? Shoot!