Brand Safety Crisis Can Prompt Consumer Backlash Against Brand

In this article, MarTechSeries comments a survey conducted by the Trustworthy Accountability Group (TAG) and Brand Safety Institute (BSI). Hereafter are our takeaways:

Customers have a broad definition of “Brand Safety”

“The survey also discovered that consumers define brand safety broadly, including issues such as ad-related piracy and malware, as well as those involving ad placement around inappropriate content.”

“Inappropriate” content has a very personal definition…

As discussed in previous posts for Fake News: What is fake for someone is not fake for others. Take Homeopathy. Some believes in it, others do not.  The same applies to “inappropriate”. Some people believe a content is inappropriate, others won’t. Like for Rap lyrics for example.

Brand means values and values are emotions.

… but, for a very large majority,  has negative impacts. On everyone involved.

From the article:

Advertisers responsibility

  • Large majorities of respondents said advertisers should prevent their ads from running near hate speech (73 percent), pornographic content (73 percent), violent content (70 percent), and illegal drug-related content (69 percent).
  • More than half of respondents said that advertisers should prevent their ads from running near stolen/pirated movies or TV shows (53 percent) and unsafe or hacked websites (73 percent).
  • Less than half of respondents said advertisers should prevent their ads from running near gambling-related content (43 percent) or controversial political views (41 percent).

Majority says negative impacts are real.

  • The overwhelming majority of respondents (90 percent) said it was very or somewhat important for advertisers to make sure their ads don’t appear near dangerous, offensive, or inappropriate content.
  • If respondents discovered ads for a product they regularly buy had appeared next to racist Neo-Nazi propaganda, 87 percent said they would reduce their spending on that product, and 58 percent said they would stop buying it altogether.
  • If respondents discovered such ads next to terrorist recruiting videos, 90 percent would reduce their spending on the product advertised, and 67 percent would stop buying it altogether.
  • If respondents discovered such ads on a website promoting illegal activities such as stolen videos and other content, 82 percent would reduce their spending on the product advertised, and 45 percent would stop buying it altogether.
  • If respondents discovered such an ad had infected their computer or mobile device with malware, 93 percent would reduce their spending on the product advertised, and 73 percent would stop buying it altogether.

Everybody is accounted responsible: Advertiser, Ad Agency, Publisher, Ad Tech.

  • When asked who should be responsible for ensuring ads do not run with dangerous, offensive, or inappropriate content, respondents assigned responsibility broadly, with 70 percent naming the advertiser, 68 percent the ad agency, 61 percent the website owner, and 46 percent the technology provider.

Bottom line:

* Your Brand, to be truly safe, must be compatible with the brand of the publisher, or any support.

* This can only be done via AI profiling as it must be Unbiased, Universal and always Up-to-date.

* This can not be done by keyword-based queries. Keywords in a page don’t profile brand values.

TrustedOut’s solution for Brand Safety in 1 slide:

Questions? Contact us!

 

 

 

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Freddy Mini

CEO & Co-founder