Developed nations distrust Social Networks, Developing ones don’t.

This post is inspired from this The Guardian (UK Edition) article

More than four in five Britons distrust platforms such as Facebook and Twitter…

“…with other developed nations such as France, Germany and the US not far behind. The attitudes contrast sharply with those in middle-income countries such as Brazil, India and Mexico, where trust is far higher…. just 12% trusted information from social media, compared with 83% who had little or no trust in platforms such as Facebook and Twitter.

Less than 30% trust in Social Networks in developed nations, more than 50% in developing ones.

“In all, 23% of Americans said they trusted information gained from social media, as did 20% of Germans, and 28% of Canadians. In developing nations, however, the trust was much higher: a majority of Indians (52%), Saudis (52%) and Thais (52%) trusted information from social media – as did 51% of Poles.”

UK and US do trust Local news orgs.

“Just two sources of information were trusted by a majority of Britons: national TV news channels (61%) and local news organisations (54%). Only the US was more mistrusting of information sources in general. According to the polling, local news organisations are the sole news sources that are trusted by a majority of Americans (58%).”

Cambridge Analytica, Christchurch, US Elections… all had a toll on Social Networks.

“The Cambridge Analytica scandal highlighted big tech’s ability and willingness to harvest data and subvert democracy, while the Christchurch shooting is the latest example of terrorism encouraged by online radicalisation.

YouTube has continually been found showing inappropriate content to children, and all the social networks have been implicated in nation-state information warfare, beginning with Russian trolls uncovered on Twitter after the US election.”

The desire for regularization.

“Episodes such as these explain why Britain is leading calls for increased levels of regulation of social media and technology companies. More than 60% of Britons think those businesses should be regulated more than they are now, compared with just 6% who think there is too much regulation and 15% who think there is the right amount.”

Social Media vs Traditional Media

From a previous post:

Get information from Traditional Media, have conversation on Social Media. Not the other way around.

Must gauge who’s talking.

We are basing this post on theguardian.com UK Edition. Prior to write anything, we, of course, use TrustedOut to understand who they are.

They are no spotted as any toxic content, such as fake news, fake sciences, conspiracist… But are they knowledgeable about publishing? Let’s ask for TrustedOut Taxonomy:

TheGuardian.com UK Edition classified by TrustedOut AI-Operated Taxonomy.

We decided they were legit and wrote this post.

Questions? Shoot!

 

 

Quiet trendsetters quietly distrust Social Media.

“Quiet Trendsetters Study Highlights Distrust of Social Media, with Implications for the Political Class”

[this post is inspired by a Cision article]

Quiet Trendsetters?

Quiet Trendsetters: people less likely to be vocal about their attitudes and opinions, highlights both the use of and distrust of social media.

Why it matters?

The results have implications as politicians ramp up their use of social media going into 2020.

Boredom or curiosity but both with caution.

Many turn to social media out of boredom or curiosity about what friends and family are up to.  A few say they only log in when they are seeking specific information. However, these Quiet Trendsetters also see a dark side to social media and agree caution is needed when using these platforms. 

No fame-seeking and less impact from “influencers”.

Politicians eying 2020 runs can feel confident that  Quiet Trendsetters will accept their social media use –  this group  understands their need to use social media as one more tool for outreach.  However, they accept it as a means rather than an end. So candidates must stay on message and not appear to be fame-seeking.  

Another caution is that, collectively, Quiet Trendsetters are less trusting of what they see on social media and than they may have been in the past and appear to be less impacted by the “influencer” model.  To reach this population, social media engagement must be completely authentic. 

Questions? Shoot!

Important does not mean interesting. Quite the opposite.

Inversely proportionated.

The more Important a news topic is for daily life, the less interesting it is to follow.

Weather, Crime and traffic are top important for daily life but definitely not topics to follow.

Gov and Politics #1 in not important for daily life and a third of interest to follow vs Restaurants, Clubs and Bars.

This is to be related to:

The decline of local newspapers impact on democracy.

and this, to save a declining situation:

“Local leads to trust”

taken seriously by Google, Facebook, Knight Foundation, Automatic…

Saving journalism. [updated 2/19/19]

Questions? Shoot!

 

 

 

Brands buy Media Brands.

Reaching out to customers. Potential and existing.

There was advertising.
There was sponsoring.
There also was Commercial Brands creating their own media brand, such as (sources: Axios):

Now, Brands buy Media Brands

Robinhood, a trading app (raised $110M in 2017), instead of creating its own brand like seen above, is buying one: MarketSnacks , a newsletter and podcast media brand focused on financial trading. An interesting evolution for the media industry. Imagine, Nissan buying Car and Driver? Yes, I hear you. Jeff Bezos owns the Washington Post, but it’s not Amazon and WaPo is not a straight coverage for Amazon either.

All about transparency.

As written, trust in Media will come back with Privacy and Transparency. As long as you are aware of who is behind a Media, (or political orientation, or depth of expertise…) the content will be educational and useful as long as you accept the profile of the media.

Top 2019 predictions: Privacy and Transparency

04.11.19.900.Paris

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Questions? Shoot!

 

Facebook’s news tab is a great idea IF users can curate her/his sources.

Screenshot from Facebook

The new News tab idea…

If you have an hour, this video/conversation is definitely worth it. Matthias Döpfner, Axel Springer’s CEO, was blunt and asked the right questions, from a journalist, online and print publisher, EU guy.

… if the user can define her/his trust criteria.

My fav part is well explained in this Recode article and in particular, the News tab idea is great but, to me and unsurprisingly, only if the FB user can do its own curation of publishers meeting his/her trust values.

“And as Zuckerberg notes in his comments, he isn’t sure whether Facebook should be curating a mix of news for users or letting them pick most of what they want to see.

Trust is personal. No-one can tell you what you trust.

As we wrote:

While distrust is general, trust definition is personal.

This is the foundation of TrustedOut.

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Questions? Shoot!

Online lie detector or Machine learning how to lie.

Online lie detector or Machine learning how to lie.

Interesting article in Wired “RESEARCHERS BUILT AN ‘ONLINE LIE DETECTOR.’ HONESTLY, THAT COULD BE A PROBLEM”

Yes, it’s a first attempt. Yes, it should be taken very cautiously.
But yes, it has merit.

Typing and writing.

The way you type and the words you use show a level of lie or truth, from your standpoint. While recording and analyzing the typing part sounds more like a lie detection test, the word used are, in fact, much more accurate.

TrustedOut uses a similar method.

As mentioned, TrustedOut uses extensively machine learning. In this previous post, we explained how machine learning is the basis of our classification. For taxonomy or how to spot how a media is perceived on the internet.

The How and What: Mixing attitude and expertise.

Now, imagine you mix an attitude, such as lying or being blunt, or positive, or sarcastic and a taxonomy classification, and you mix two or more classifications based on machine learning. And you get the how and what…

04.11.19.900.Paris

If you are in Paris on April 11th, 9-11am, come and see us! Registration here.

Questions? Shoot!

 

Distrust in Media driven by distrust in government.

According to VisionCritical: “trust [in Media] among the informed public in the U.S. plunged 23 points to 45, making it the lowest of the 28 countries surveyed. The collapse of trust is driven by a staggering lack of faith in government. This fell 14 points to 33 percent among the general population, and 30 points to 33 percent among the informed public. [Numbers are for the USA]”

63% can’t recognize journalism from rumors.

“The 2018 Trust Barometer found 63 percent of respondents don’t know how to tell good journalism from rumor, or whether a respected media organization had produced a piece of news. But the public doesn’t rely solely on news media organizations to stay informed. We also use search engines and social media. The irony is that these platforms—once hailed as the future of media—are hurting too. The rising distrust of traditional media comes at a time when social media giants such as Facebook are facing intense scrutiny about their role in spreading disinformation. The Huffington Post recently announced it would no longer rely on unpaid bloggers.

Journalism for the win!

It’s all about brand values.

We recently published in “Why customer trust is more vital to [media] brand survival than it’s ever been” :

Gaining trust: demonstrate [media] brand clarity of purpose and core values and be transparent with all policies and procedures.

“Board and staff members need to adhere to these ethical standards as, in effect, they are the brand and only they can elicit consumer trust,” he [Director of brand agency Hulsbosch, Jaid Hulsbosch] says.

To do this, a corporation and its brand needs to be determined to demonstrate brand clarity of purpose and core values and be transparent with all policies and procedures”

Profiling Media Brands to secure trust in analytics and brand safety.

Brand values for any business, including Media, are the foundation of trust for customers, readers. Understanding them is the solution to secure trust in analytics support for strategic decision making and totally secure advertiser’s brand within a campaign.

Questions? Shoot!

 

Time for journalists to acknowledge that they write from a set of values, not simply from a disinterested effort at truth?

As Columbia Journalism Review puts it, “one gets the sense that the pitch of anti-press sentiment is now the most fevered it’s been since the founding of the republic. In fact, presidents from George Washington on, including Thomas Jefferson… judged newspapers to be full of lies. “. Sounds familiar?

Credits: cjr.org

Readers responsibility to discern for themselves the difference between what can be trusted as factual and reporter’s judgment. 

“… the old days of ritually objective news reporting (he said/she said) are not gone but have been reduced in importance from the 1970s on, as mainstream outlets have increasingly emphasized analysis in news coverage—not quite so much “who, what, when, where” as “why.” There has been a profound cultural shift in journalism during this period. The limitations of straitjacketed objectivity came to be understood and journalism began to embrace the necessity of interpretation… In the face of the severe economic problems afflicting daily newspapers, leading metro dailies have continued, whenever possible, to pursue aggressive, analytical journalism. This places great responsibility on readers to discern for themselves the difference between what can be trusted as factual and what represents the reporter’s judgment—a judgment that, however conscientious, goes beyond documented facts.”

“It may also be time for journalists to acknowledge that they write from a set of values, not simply from a disinterested effort at truth.”

“This will not be easy, since journalists have spent decades denying that their personal values have anything to do with their news reporting.”

Trust is personal. Personal is Trust.

“Tom Rosenstiel, the executive director of the American Press Institute, told her that for many people, “there’s ‘the media’ (bad) and there’s ‘my media’ (fairly good).” Likewise, he noted, people have little faith in Congress but think their own local representatives are okay.

Sounds familiar? Yep. We wrote about this…

developed in this post: While distrust is general, trust definition is personal.

Bottom line: Media should strengthen their brand values with the upmost  transparency to increase Reader’s trust.

Questions? Shoot!

“Local leads to trust”

“The shorter the distance between our neighbors and our news, the stronger our community.”

This article from NiemanLab about an event organized by the Knight Foundation is a perfect follow up to our previous post:

The decline of local newspapers impact on democracy.

Saving the Soldat Local News

… and, as a reminder the Knight Foundation did commit an addition $300M to support journalism and local news

Saving journalism. [updated 2/19/19]

The American Journalism Project

Things are definitely moving with the launch of the American Journalism Project, a venture philanthropy effort co-led by Chalkbeat founder Elizabeth Green and Texas Tribune founder John Thornton, with $42 million in its first fund.

Attention, money, efforts… we’ll keep you updated on this. Stay tuned.

Questions? Shoot!

 

 

“Why customer trust is more vital to [media] brand survival than it’s ever been”

We recently wrote in the post below:

“Your Trust is based on the publisher brands you value.”

TrustedOut’s market

Because Trust and brands are so linked, including for Media, we wanted to share our takeaways from this CMO (Chief Marketing Officer) article “Why customer trust is more vital to brand survival than it’s ever been” [article applies beyond Australia].

Authenticity is key to trust, so how do [media] brands build this in a world of digital and social upheaval?

“Simply saying a brand is going to do something, without backing it up with actions, is a consumer disaster waiting to happen.”

“It’s about being transparent, doing what is expected and shared values. Key to this is the internal culture of the brand becoming more evident,” she [Qualtrics customer experience subject matter expert and principal consultant, Vicky Katsabaris] says. “The expectation is you deliver to those values with more purpose-driven activities so you are living and breathing the values.

Gaining trust: demonstrate [media] brand clarity of purpose and core values and be transparent with all policies and procedures.

“Board and staff members need to adhere to these ethical standards as, in effect, they are the brand and only they can elicit consumer trust,” he [Director of brand agency Hulsbosch, Jaid Hulsbosch] says.

To do this, a corporation and its brand needs to be determined to demonstrate brand clarity of purpose and core values and be transparent with all policies and procedures”

2019 predictions.

This confirms our predictions for 2019…

Top 2019 predictions: Privacy and Transparency

…  and confirms the uptrend in trust in media lately.