Lessons for growing publisher revenue by removing 3rd party tracking*

*Source: Brave https://brave.com/publisher-3rd-party-tracking/

This post was originally on August 3rd 2020

The end of 3rd party cookies

On January 14th of this year, Google wrote: Building a more private web: A path towards making third party cookies obsolete

How personal data are “broadcast”.

We highly recommend this document, “Behavioural advertising and personal data”, from Dr Johnny Ryan, where we can read:

“…every time a person loads a page on a website that uses real-time bidding advertising, personal data about them are broadcast to tens – or hundreds – of companies. Here is a sample of the personal data broadcast.

●  What you are reading or watching
●  Your location (OpenRTB also includes full IP address)
●  Description of your device
●  Unique tracking ID or a “cookie match” to allow advertising technology companies to try to identify you the next time you are seen, so that a long-term profile can be built or consolidated with offline data about you
●  Your IP address (depending on the version of “RTB” system)
●  Data broker segment ID, if available. This could denote things like your income bracket, age and gender, habits, social media influence, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, political leaning, etc. (depending on the version of “RTB” system)”

“We used to read the newspaper, now the news reads us.”

This quote from the Global Editors Network. We strongly encourage you to read the article using the quote as a title and try the section “What happens when you read an article online”. Below is a screenshot for Spiegel.de

1 out of 5 happy for their data to be shared (UK, 2017)

In 2017, GFK was commissioned by IAB Europe (the AdTech industry’s own trade body) to survey 11,000 people across the EU about their attitudes to online media and advertising. GFK reported that only “20% would be happy for their data to be shared with third parties for advertising purposes”. [source]

Finding#1: Removing 3rd party tracking/AdTech and investing in Context increases revenue!

The first chart and the chart below are from the article from Brave.com, “lessons for growing publisher revenue by removing 3rd party tracking” both demoing the revenue increase is attributable to removing 3rd party tracking and adtech.

NPO and its sales house, Ster, invested in contextual targeting and testing, and produced vast sales increases even with sites that do not appear to dominate their categories.

The Covid-19 market shock shifted the market from video to display

Finding#2: “legitimate publishers of all size can increase revenue”. The New York Times example…

On their site, Open.nytimes.com, they wrote: “As of April 2019, we [The New York Times] removed all third-party data controllers from our homepage, section fronts and articles. … This reduced the amount of data we shared with third-party data controllers by over 90 percent. We are working on ways to improve this number…”

Finding#3. “Context is powerful.”

“NPO properties now provide no geotagging, no frequency capping, and no cross device measurement. Despite the absence of these features, extensive testing with advertisers has proven that the ads are effective, and advertisers are spending more with NPO than before.”

Next read:

TrustedOut partners with Xandr to bring new intelligence in targeting capabilities

Introducing the Brand Safety Report

The game is rigged: A former marketer shows you how Big Tech’s advertising practices harm us all

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Freddy Mini

CEO & Co-founder