Should governments deal with fake news?

In this article, “Singapore just used its fake news law. Critics say it’s just what they feared“, CNN Business explains why the new anti-fake news law in Singapore produced what they feared most: “increased censorship and official overreach in a country where freedom of expression is already under pressure.”, adding: “This week’s events suggest those fears may be justified.”

“as required by Singaporean law.”

We won’t debate on the two articles under the scrutiny of the Singapore government, but rather focus on one thing very important for us:

Censorship must be and remain personal.

It is always dangerous to leave to someone what you can read and cannot.

CNN reports: “Government ministers can decide whether to order something deemed fake news to be taken down, or require a correction to be put up alongside it. They can also order companies such as Facebook (FB) and Google (GOOGL) — both of which opposed the bill — to block accounts or sites spreading false information.

The government can also prosecute individuals with fines of up to 50,000 Singapore dollars (about $36,000) and/or up to five years in prison. If the alleged falsehood is posted using “an inauthentic online account or controlled by a bot,” the potential fine rises to 100,000 Singapore dollars (around $73,000), and/or up to 10 years in prison.

Companies found guilty of spreading so-called fake news can face fines of up to 1 million Singapore dollars (roughly $735,000).”

Again, we, TrustedOut do not defend the spread of fake news or any offending content but we believe, for the most part, news can be seen as fake for some people and not fake for others, thus, censorship should be and remain Personal.

Get information from Traditional Media, have conversation on Social Media. Not the other way around.

In a previous post, we wrote:
“Misinformation and biases infect social media, both intentionally and accidentally. This highly recommended article from The Conversation exposes 3 types of bias identified by Indiana University. Hereafter are our takeaways… Continue reading

Trust, Media and Democracy

Related to this matter, we also wrote on the excellent Knight Foundation Report.

The Aspen Institute and the Knight Foundation recently released a report on a commission they organized about Trust, Media and Democracy. While coming from America, we believe most can apply wider.

If you don’t have the time for the length report, this medium page is very interesting. Here are our takeaways in the light of our previous posts, regrouped in 3 main categories:

10 ways to rebuild trust in media and democracy…  Continue reading

Define the content you trust for every segment of your business.

Hereafter is an example of an Enterprise organized by Industry. Also applies to any other type of business organization.

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Freddy Mini

CEO & Co-founder